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Abstract

The feminine Rococo appearence of the Premonstratensian Nuns’ Convent in Chotěšov (West Bohemia) was due to the frescoes executed in 1754 by Franz Julius Lux. The mystical Marian iconography of the Chapterhouse frescoes corresponds to a Premonstrensian tradition.

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Abstract

It is a commonplace that after the release of a new monograph so-far unknown works begin to rise to the surface one after the other. In the case of Johann Lucas Kracker the first to appear were parallel research results, of which most noteworthy are PetrArijčuk's attributions based on archival sources. He discovered the fourth member of the refectory series in the Franciscan monastery of Moravská Třebová (The Feast of St Francis, 1759) and made the daring identification between the high altar picture in the hospital church of St Elizabeth in Znojmo with the Assumption of the Virgin long missing from Slavonice. On the basis of data from the Premonstratensian archives of Nova Řiše Václáv Milek offered a more exact dating for the altar pictures of the abbey: the pictures delivered in 1760 preceded by years not only Kracker's frescoes in the same church but also the similar works at Jasov. The late altar pictures from Banská Bystrica and the paintings discovered around Jasov were probably created with the participation of the workshop.

The recently discovered oil sketches associated with Kracker proved to be by a follower of Daniel Gran, Josef Stern and by Andreas Zallinger. Nor is the pair of bozzetti acquired recently by the Diözesanmuseum of Brixen by Kracker or by Paul Troger; they must be small-scale copies of Kracker's side altarpieces in Prague or of their sketches, or again, copies of the – now lost – Troger works used as their models. One of them – The Death of St Joseph – was also found in another variant in the Viennese art trade. What were put up for auction in Budapest were workshop copies of a pair of cabinet pictures in the Gallery of Eger – Adoration of the Shepherds, Adoration of the Magi, around 1764 – true to the original colours, which means that they were made after the paintings and not their engraved models.

There is less novelty in the realm of frescoes. The division of labour in the decoration of the Šaštín church of pilgrimage is gradually clarified: in addition to Joseph Chamant and Joseph Ignaz Mildorfer, Kracker's contribution can be presumed to the painted decoration of two subsidiary chapels in 1757. The shared attributon of the parish church of Japons has to be revised: the Apotheosis of St Lawrence on the ceiling is also Kracker's work dated 1767. In the former Jesuit church of Eger wall probings brought to light not only the baroque ornaments on the lateral walls of the nave but also the backdrop in the chancel described in the sources and the original painting by Kracker's workshop on the high altar adorned with statues.

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This study examines a piece of smith's work preserved in the permanent exhibition of the Budapest Liszt Memorial Museum, which portrays scenes from the Paradise of Dante's Divina Commedia. Formerly owned by Liszt, this object is a galvanoplastic replica of a sketched drawing by Peter Cornelius for his Dante ceiling in the Villa Massima in Rome. Even so, the work preserved in the Liszt Museum is nowhere mentioned in the literature on Cornelius. The name of the donor (cardinal Hohenlohe) and the year of its donation (1867) are already known to us. These circumstances allow us to conclude that its presentation as a gift may have been in connection with the successful performances of Liszt's Dante Symphony in Rome. The work was performed at the inauguration of the Dante Galeria (February 26th 1866). The patron of the exhibition was Johannes, the King of Saxony, in whose possession the drawing was at the time. The opening ceremony provided the occasion for Hohenlohe to come into contact with the ruler of Saxony, and request a loan of the drawing in order to make the galvanoplastic replica.

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. However, if Allegro were right, then entheogens were integral to the origins of Judeo-Christianity with their usage persisting at least into medieval times, as evidenced by the Plaincourault fresco that was painted after 1000 CE. This positive

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Ioustinianos and has 50 preserved temples that belong to Byzantine and post-Byzantine period. Remarkable Byzantine monuments are preserved in Kastoria, with wall paintings with the flawless technique of fresco and rare samples of Byzantine icons and woodcut

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Summary

An analyse of F. A. Maulbertsch's „poetical“mode, based on his narrative retable frescoes in the Parish Church in Sümeg, as opposed to the epic painting represented here by Daniel Gran.

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Summary

The ceiling fresco of the tower-room in Sárvár Castle follows with a few iconographic and compositional changes the fresco of Daniel Gran (1730) in the main hall of the Hofbibliothek (at present Österreichische Nationalbibliothek) in Vienna. The frescoes, in a bad condition and restored in 1960, were held to be works by Stefan Dorffmeister form the end of the 1760s. Mainly on the basis of its compositional qualities, the frescoes in Sárvár show many ressenblances with works by Joseph Ignaz Mildorfer, made in the 1750s and 1760s for Hungarian patrons, among them the ceiling of the Chapel in the Esterházy Castle in Pápa (1758), the dome-fresco of the Chapel (1964) and the ceiling in the main hall (1766/67) of the Palacee of Eszterháza. The closest relationship can be observed with the painted decoration of the state room of the Forgách Castle in Gács (Halič, Slovakia, early 1760s). The frescoes in S Sárvár can be dated according to the relationships of the owners before 1759, when the Castle belonged to Count Georg Szluha and his wife, Rosalie Sinzendorf (whose mother was a Countess Draskovich). The subject of the painting as well as the choice of the painter could be the result of the Szluha connection with the imperial court and also by the fact that his wife was related to Count Antal Grassalkovich. The latter was in contact with architects at the imperial court (N. Pacassi, J. N. Jadot), working with Mildorfer. The iconography of the tower-room represents a mixture of traditional iconography of libraries and of sale terrene, so its function as a private closet, a kind of Baroque studiolo can be supposed.

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The background-color blue on the Bull-Leaping-Fresco (as well as on the Sarcophagus from Hagia Triada) stands for the night-time. At a clear full-moon-night or during dawn and during dusk the action of leaping is very difficult, but certainly possible, especially in the mind of the painter.

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Abstract

The paper analyses the baroque ceiling paintings of the Pauline pilgrimage church in Šaštín (Slovakia), signed in 1757 by Jean-Joseph Chamant, scene designer and theatre architect at the Vienna court and protégé of Emperor Franz I Stefan of Lorraine. In 1736 Franz Stefan purchased manors in the neighbourhood, thus became patron of the pilgrimage church in Šaštín, built in 1736–62. The Emperor and Queen Maria Theresa frequently visited the pilgrimage shrine while sojourning in their chateau in Holiè and contributed with significant donations to the construction of the church, and then to the decoration of the church interior: the high altar was commissioned by the Queen in 1762 and designed by the court architect Nikolaus Pacassi. According to archival sources Chamant's fee was paid by the Paulines, consequently the frescos can not be qualified as explicit court commission. Chamant was the primary contractor of the work, yet, being a scene designer, his contribution to the fresco cycle must have been limited to the painted architecture, including a trompe-l'oeil dome over the nave. The figurative compositions of the fresco cycle were carried out presumably by Joseph Ignaz Mildorfer, professor of the Vienna Art Academy, who received several court commissions in the 1750s. The fresco cycle consists of allegorical scenes referring to Christ's redeeming death, in correlation with the miraculous statue, a Pietà, placed on the high altar.

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Abstract

The ceiling sketch painted in bright colours in a punctiliously detailed manner against a rich architectural background has been associated with Josef Adam Mölk by researches of recent years. After studies at the Vienna Academy, and some 15 years' work in Bavaria and Tyrol, the painter took on executing frescoes and altarpieces in Styria from 1764, and worked in Lower Austria for the last twelve years of his life. During his long and prolific life he executed his designs with the help of his workshop associates.

During his years in Styria there was a single occasion when he worked outside the province: in the monastic church of pilgrimage at Maria Langegg in Lower Austria in 1773. He signed a contract to paint the ceiling frescoes and altarpieces for the Servite church of the Birth of Mary in December 1772. From among the scenes of the life of Mary, her birth is seen in the presbytery; the mentioned oil sketch for this cupola fresco is kept at the Hungarian National Gallery. Mölk's fresco painting was fundamentally influenced by the Italian architect and painter Andrea Pozzo's pseudo cupola painting and artistic theory, which is also confirmed by this sketch. Its “protagonist” is the spectacular architecture. Minutely decorated, diverse architectonic elements, daringly foreshortened domes characterize the major works of this period in the churches of Rein (1766), Weizberg (1771), Pernegg (1775), the latter also containing a somewhat simplified version of the Birth of Mary composition of Maria Langegg.

Mölk's only known work in Hungary is the Assumption ceiling fresco in the chancel of the Benedictine church of Zalaapáti from 1781. It is presumed that Martin Johann Schmidt who painted the altarpiece for the church contacted Mölk for the commission.

An early piece by the painter is kept at the Hungarian National Museum. It is probably in connection with his appointment as court painter. The historical allegory dated 1755 is a fine example of Mölk's minutely elaborated and detailed painting style.

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