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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Q. Riaz, K. Ács, F. Békés, R.F. Eastwood, A. Farahnaky, M. Majzoobi and C.L. Blanchard

Grain fructans play an important role in the physiology of wheat plants and also impact on the health of consumers of wheat-based products. Given the potential economic importance of fructan levels, if genetic variability could be identified for this trait, it may be a potentially useful breeding target for developing climate-resilient and nutritionally enhanced wheat varieties. The aim of the current study was to screen 78 genetically diverse Australian wheat varieties released between 1860 and 2015 to determine if historic breeding targets have resulted in changes in fructan levels and to identify potential breeding parents for the development of varieties with specific fructan levels. The impact of seasonal conditions on grain fructan levels were also investigated. Analysis of the varieties in this study indicated that historic breeding targets have not impacted on grain fructan levels. Fructan content in flours varied between 1.01 to 2.27%, showing some variation among the varieties. However, a significant variation in fructan levels was observed between different harvest years (mean values for 2015 and 2016 samples were 1.38 and 1.74%, respectively). While large variations in fructan contents of different varieties were not found, there were some varieties with consistently higher or lower fructan contents which could be used to breed varieties with specific fructan levels.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: M. Bekers, M. Marauska, M. Grube, D. Karklina and M. Duma

Bekers, M., Laukevics, J., Upite, D., Kaminska, E., Vigants, A. & Viesturs, U. (2000): Metode ruktanu iegáMšai no saharozes . (Method for obtaining fructans from sucrose.) Application of Latvian atent P-00-173. Cote

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Pontis, H. G. (1989): Fructans and cold stress. J. Plant Physiol. 134, 148-150. Fructans and cold stress J. Plant Physiol

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. 42 729 737 Housley, L., Pollock, C. J. (1993): The metabolism of fructan in higher plants. pp. 191-225. In: Suzuki, M., Chatterton, N. J. (eds

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: T. Prokopov, A. Slavov, N. Petkova, V. Yanakieva, B. Bozadzhiev and D. Taneva

. Muir , J. , Shepherd , S. , Rosella , O. , Rose , R. , Barrett , J. & Gibson , P. ( 2007 ): Fructan and free fructose content of common Australian vegetables and fruit . J. Agr. Food Chem. , 55 , 6619 – 6627

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Darbyshire, B., Henry, R. J. (1978): The distribution of fructans in onions. New Phytol. , 81 , 29–34. Henry R. J. The distribution of fructans in onions

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In order to evaluate the effect of Azosprillium inoculation and molybdenum application on common barley grown in saline condition, a greenhouse experiment was conducted at Azad university, branch of Eghlid, Iran. The experimental design was factorial based on complete randomized design with four replications. The first factor comprised of four salinity treatments (1 as control, 5, 10 and 15 ds m−1), second factor comprised the levels of Mo application (1: treated and 2: untreated = control) and the third factor included two levels of Azosprillum inoculation (inoculated and uninoculated = control). The measured parameters were chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis (Ps) rates, carbohydrates, nitrate, ammonium and protein content, nitrogenase activity, grain yield (GY) and yield components. The results showed that salinity decreased GY in all levels. GY reduction in inoculated treatment was lower (12.9%) than uninoculated treatment (29.7%). GY reduction was highly related to the reduction of grain number (GN) rather than reduction in ear mX2. Inoculation and application of Mo reduced harmful effects of salinity especially on mean kernel weight and grain number. Soluble saccharides and protein contents increased with increasing salinity. Inoculation and Mo application significantly increased the content of fructan and sucrose respectively. The mean values of Fv/Fm and photosynthesis rate reduced in the salinity treatments compared to the control. Inoculation and Mo application significantly increased photosynthesis rates at all salinity levels. The highest plant N content was obtained from inoculated, control salinity treatment by applying Mo. In inoculated barley roots with application of Mo, nitrogenase activity (NA) was not severely inhibited by salinity. Data also showed that Mo application positively affected nitrogenase activity. Inoculation, caused plant to cope on the stress, effectively by increasing fructan content and NO3/NH4 ratio and lower decrease in whole plant N content and Fv/Fm ratio. Generally, Azosprillium inoculation helped plants perform better under salinity treatments and Mo application ameliorated plant nitrogen status.

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) Fourth International Fructan Symposium . Arolla, Switzerland, pp. 16–18. Pátkai Gy. (Abstracts) Fourth International Fructan Symposium

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: R. Sárosi, K. Manninger-Kóczán, P. Penksza, R. Juhász, B. Szabó-Nótin, L. Szakács and J. Barta

Abrams, S.A., Griffin, I.J., Hawthorne, K.M., Liang, L.L., Gunn, S.K., Darlington, G. & Ellis, K.J. (2005): A combination of prebiotic short- and long-chain inulin-type fructans enhances calcium

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