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first is the inherent lexico-grammatical features of the source and target languages. Another factor is the text genre, as different text genres favour different forms of syntactic units to fulfil their textual functions. For instance, Elsness (1984

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repeatedly raised as unavoidable for any stage production. 12 The libretto was written as a pantomime, a topical literary genre at the turn of the twentieth century in Vienna, by the internationally celebrated playwright Melchior (Menyhért) Lengyel (1880

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This study offers a multilevel analysis of the form of the third movement of Mahler’s Second Symphony providing three frameworks (those of a sophisticated trio form, a bipartite idiosyncratic form, and an imaginary, ‘endless’ form). Conceiving of the formal dimensions of the Scherzo of Mahler’s Second Symphony as ontological models, I will contextualize these with reference to the writings of E.T.A. Hoffmann, Schopenhauer, and Nietzsche. Among the new discoveries of this investigation, I will outline the implications of three hitherto neglected circumstances: first, the movement’s first extended unit itself constitutes a self-contained symphonic scherzo movement; next, the movement can be described as two succeeding permutations of the same set of thematic materials; finally, there is a crucial recurrence suggesting the infinitude of the form. Instead of creating an ill-conceived dichotomy between form as a secondary structure and the meaningful ‘narrative’ in negotiation with formal questions, I wish to regard form as a primary source of a work’s meaning. At the same time, I wish to regard the form of the movement as an efficient means of channelling its dialogue with the genre of scherzo. Listened to as a composer’s self-positioning in the field of the masters of symphony, the movement reveals Mahler’s successful attempt at breaking away from the Brucknerian model of scherzo and, at the same time, proudly parading his virtuosity in applying some elements of that model in a different context.

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Corpus-based studies in the field of word-formation have looked at translated language with the aim of (i) assessing the role of the source language (SL) in the overuse of certain derivational affixes in the target language (TL) and (ii) examining translationrelated, SL- and TL-independent trends such as the normalization of creative lexis. However, two aspects of the word-formation features of translated language remain underresearched: (i) language-pair specific properties which lead to a marked decrease in the use of certain word-forming devices in the target texts compared to their source texts (here referred to as ‘language-pair specific morphological decrease’) and (ii) the genre-sensitivity of word-forming devices in translated language. To examine these two aspects, we report on a corpus-based case study of the French translation of the English un- and in-prefixes. The translation data makes it possible to identify the following language-pair-related factors which are responsible for morphological decrease in French target texts: morphological productivity, diverging polysemy and partial phraseological equivalence. The study also shows that morphological decrease is significantly more frequent in fiction than in news, thereby indicating that genre also plays a major role in shaping the word-formation features of translated language.

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Euihyeon Na
,
Inyoung Choi
,
Taek-Ho Lee
,
Hyeseon Lee
,
Mi Jung Rho
,
Hyun Cho
,
Dong Jin Jung
, and
Dai-Jin Kim

conducted regarding the implication of game genre as a specific factor influencing IGD. Most previous studies have reported that the genre of game was associated with specific psychopathological profiles in individuals suspected of IGD, thus suggesting that

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Introduction Disciplines vary in the types of communicative genres they use to disseminate knowledge and citing patterns used within these genres. However, while scholars have acknowledged this difference in knowledge

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Journal of Psychedelic Studies
Authors:
Abraham Hafiz Rodriguez
,
Sarah Nath Zallek
,
Michael Xu
,
Jean Aldag
,
Lori Russell-Chapin
,
Tobias A. Mattei
, and
N. Scott Litofsky

). Additionally, despite the recent expansion of scientific literature exploring outcomes-based research aimed at investigating how common, popular music genres (e.g., classical) may be beneficial for various applications related to mood, anxiety, pain, and other

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The minuet was an integral part of multi-movement instrumental works of the Viennese Classical period, as well as playing a central role in eighteenth-century study of composition. During the nineteenth century, it was the scherzo that took over its didactic role,, which involved a shift of accent from a dance-like musical type to a kind of character piece. The variety of what “scherzo” could mean in the nineteenth century is probably the reason why there are relatively many scherzo and scherzando movements in Bartók's oeuvre. He encountered the genre quite early, already before and then during his studies of composition. The sum of his scherzos will be examined regarding tradition and originality, and also as to the intentions he had after his studies whenever he chose to compose a “scherzo.”

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Abstract

In Latvian folklore, the Devil is a relatively common image, represented in all the genres. This paper analyses the verbal charms that mention the Devil or Thunder together with the motif of pursuing the Devil. The corpus of charms consists of texts taken from the first systematic collection of Latvian charms, published in 1881. Examples of charms are accompanied by a comparative analysis of folk legends and beliefs. There are correspondences in charms, legends and beliefs regarding the appearance and traits of the Devil as well as his activities and dwelling places. These genres also share the motif of pursuing the Devil. Texts from different genres complement each other by providing missing narrative fragments and aspects of meaning. In the legends and charms, black and red dominate in the Devil’s appearance, and the Devil can also appear in the form of animals. The Devil’s activities and presence are linked with the origins of evil and associated with a variety of diseases which, like the Devil himself, are overcome by similar techniques. These legends and beliefs help us understand the similarities expressed in the charms, deepen and expand the semantics of the images, and explain the associative links and anchoring of specific actions in the broader folklore material. The plot and length of texts in charms are determined by the specific style, structure, and function of this genre. Therefore, content is not expanded in detail; instead, only key figures or images, the foundation of the plot, and its most important elements are mentioned. The comparative material found in legends and beliefs provides more in-depth explanation of the concise messages expressed in the charms.

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Due to processes of internationalisation and European integration, countries such as Slovenia have to accommodate many new textual genres, which are either introduced via translation, or written in Slovene for later translation into English. This paper presents an analytical framework developed with this situation in mind and describes how it was applied to a particular translation of a political progress report. The aim was to support the development of a more systematic approach to the production and translation of such texts. The model draws upon discourse analysis, genre analysis and contrastive functional rhetoric, and is compatible with functional approaches to translation. The top-down analysis begins with the discussion of the background to the report and its writing, the participants in the translation process, the training and support provided, and the translation strategies employed. We then go on to consider the broader linguistic and cultural background, including the relevant genre conventions. This is followed by a summary of a detailed analysis of text profile, coherence, cohesion, information structure and register features. The emphasis is on the task facing the reader and whether the communicative purpose of the text is achieved or not.

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