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Central European Geology
Authors: Attila Demény, Gabriella Schöll-Barna, Pál Sümegi, Péter Sipos, István Fórizs, Brigitta Réka Balázs, Bernadett Bajnóczi, and Gordon Cook

, radiocarbon, stable isotope and geochemical study in the Pannonian Basin, Hungary Applied Geochemistry 26 91 104 . G

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Acta Geologica Hungarica
Authors: Tamás Mikes, István Dunkl, Wolfgang Frisch, and Hilmar von Eynatten

91 611 627 Bhatia, M.R. 1985: Rare element geochemistry of Australian Paleozoic greywackes and mudrocks: Provenance and tectonic control

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M. Thirlwall K. Gméling 2007 Geochemistry, petrogenesis and geodynamic relationships of Miocene calc-alkalinevolcanic rocks in the Western

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Acta Geologica Hungarica
Authors: Réka Lukács, György Czuppon, Szabolcs Harangi, Csaba Szabó, Theodor Ntaflos, and Friedrich Koller

10153 10192 Francis, P., W., R. S. J. Sparks, C. J. Hawkesworth, R. S. Thorpe, D. M. Pyle, S. R. Tait, M. S. Mantovani, F. McDermott 1989: Petrology and geochemistry of volcanic

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Abstract

Jordan is situated on the northwestern side of the Arabian Plate, along the eastern flank of the ancient Tethys Ocean on the western side of the Dead Sea Transform. The country hosts huge phosphate deposits. The deposits at Eshidiya are comprised of overburden, four phosphate beds (A0, Al, A2 and A3), a coquina/marl waste bed, and two silicified phosphate chert interwaste beds. Eshidiya ore beds are treated separately through beneficiation and upgrading, as they produce products of different grade; they are subdivided into three classes. A 65% TCP (tricalcium phosphate) sub-commercial product is also produced. The detrimental impurities are considered to be among the lowest in the world. Chemical analyses of major oxides, organic matter and some traces in the product, which indicate almost similar chemical signature, are discussed herein.

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Abstract  

The activity of the Department of Geology, Petrology and Geochemistry University of Liège, Belgium, is discussed.

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2006 34 85 89 Crounse R. G. — Pories W. J — Bray J. T — Mauger, R.L.: 1983. Geochemistry and man: Health and disease 1

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Abstract  

Many of the initial applications for activation analysis occurred in the fields of archaeology, geochemistry and cosmochemistry. In addition to the desire to investigate noteworthy problems of interest to these disciplines, the reasons for employing activation analysis were based on the advantages of sample preparation, sensitivity, multi-element capability, and non-destructiveness. Nearly fifty years later and despite the development of several new analytical methods, we find that many of these same advantages continue to attract interest in activation analysis from these same disciplines. This overview discusses the past, present and future role of activation analysis with regard to research questions in archaeology, geochemistry, and cosmochemistry.

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47 Awdankiewicz, M., 1999 b: Volcanism in a late Variscan intramontane trough: the petrology and geochemistry of the Carboniferous and Permian volcanic rocks of the Intra-Sudetic Basin, SW

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Abstract  

The new results and developments of trace element geochemistry of magmatic processes are discussed. The interest and limits of neutron activation analysis for studies of trace element distributions in magnetic rocks are shown.

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