Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • "goldsmith's art" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

This is the sixth part of a series of publications about the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary based on archival sources, registrars, citizens’ registers, guild documents, tax registers processed by cities and regions. The goldsmiths and silversmiths revealed by the above documents by name are compared with the old research literature to rectify its data on the one hand, and on the other, goldsmith's marks and objects are attributed to the particular artists. The present publication reviews the history of goldsmith's art in Nagyszombat (today Trnava, Slovakia), the first part of which – the 15–17th century – was released in Művészettörténeti Értesítő 2009/1. Now the equally rich output of the 18–19th centuries is taken stock of, together with the names of several artists. Some published art works are known from public collections, others from private owners or art dealers.

Restricted access

Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VI. Nagyszombat (I. rész: 15–17. század)

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VI. Nagyszombat / Trnava (Part I: 15–17th centuries)

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The paper is a chapter in the systematic exploration of goldsmith's art in historical Hungary. While in another series of publications, the author summarizes the historical information on goldsmith dynasties in various towns, matching it with the extant works. He makes an attempt to redefine the 16–17th century proof-marks. Here, he relies on the registers of Nagyszombat (today: Trnava in Slovakia). In the Addenda he publishes proof-marks and objects who have wrongly attributed to masters from Nagyszombat.

Restricted access

Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VII. Keszthely, Komárom

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VII. Keszthely, Komárom

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The article is part of a series of similar title. The author already addressed himself earlier to metalworking in the towns of Keszthely and Komárom, but new archival sources have become accessible. From birth/marriage/death registers and tax registers the names of further goldsmiths could be gleaned, while the family relations of others could be clarified. A specific group of relics, the typical silver chains of Gypsy voivods made around 1850 were successfully tied up with goldsmith József Setosits of Keszthely. Museum objects can be attached to data in the 17th century register data of Komárom: works by György Szentjóby, Master KB. From among the goldsmith's dynasties of the 19th century, the Grünhut family can be traced up to 1944.

Restricted access

Iparművészeti tárgyak a gr. Vigyázó család gyűjteményében

Applied Art Objects in The Collection of The Counts Vigyázó

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Hilda Horváth

Abstract

The reconstruction of the collection of the Count Vigyázó family is based on documents, archive photos as well as over 250 silver objects in the Goldsmith's Department of the Museum of Applied Arts and nearly two dozen art works (tapestry, silverware, furniture) in the art collection of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. All this is, however, only a fragment of the one-time collection associated with Count Sándor Vigyázó of Bojár (1825–1921) and his son Ferenc (1874–1928).

Apart from the acquisitions of these two counts, the collection was also enlarged through the fusion of the goods of two families. Sándor Vigyázó married baroness Zsuzsanna Podmaniczky in 1873, a wealthy scion of an Aszód-based historic family of aristocrats. The growth of the collection was also facilitated by collateral inheritance within the family as well as by purchases e.g. from the collection of Géza Kárász (1828–1888). By the 1880s the collection has assumed its final state, its prize possessions being tapestries, silverware, clocks and watches, jewels, weapons (mainly those connected to prominent historical persons) and caskets.

Similarly to the collection of the barons Radvánszky, a family related to the Vigyázós, the silver collection of the Vigyázó family had both culture and art historical significance. It displayed the diversity of the goldsmiths' craft and a wide array of their product types. Among their 16–17th century objects a considerable Hungarian selection was also included in addition to the works by Augsburg and Nuremberg masters. Specialties of the collection were a silver book cover adorned with a scene crafted after Dürer's print and a boat-shaped table ornament.

In the Vigyázó homes — in the country house at Vácrátót and in the palace at No. 1 Károly körút [boulevard] in Pest — there were also oriental objects beside the European pieces and contemporary art objects were also added to the historical collection.

The last will of Count Sándor Vigyázó dated February 15, 1919 spelt out that should his son Ferenc die without an heir (ultimus tituli in the family), all the Vigyázó property should pass on to the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. The testament of Mrs Sándor Vigyázó born Zsuzsanna Podmaniczky provided for the maintenance in the original state of the Podmaniczky mansion at Rákoskeresztúr. Count Ferenc Vigyázó committed suicide in 1928 and as he complied by his parents' wish, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences became heir-at-law of the fortune. The institution settled the pending debts and the legal claims of other heirs (sons and grandchild of the female line from Zsuzsanna Podmaniczky's first marriage) by auctioning off the nonmuseal part of the collection. The library was incorporated in the Academy and the antiques were exhibited in the Podmaniczky mansion at Rákoskeresztúr opened in 1935. In World War II part of the country house burnt out and the bulk of the collection perished. The rescued tapestries were temporarily deposited at the Museum of Applied Arts and in 1950 three crates of silverware were given to the museum on permanent loan. In 1951 the Academy took back some of the objects that became listed in 1952, and the rest of the silverware and the clocks that remained in the museum were integrated in the museum collections in 1953.

Restricted access

Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VIII. Veszprém, Nyitra

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VIII. Veszprém, Nyitra

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The article is the eighth part of the titular series. The goldsmith's art in Veszprém was elaborated in a monographic study by Árpád Somogyi, while Nyitra in former upper Hungary (Nitra, SK) has no such summary. The author now collates the goldsmiths known by name from the registers of births, marriages and deaths, and from tax registers with types of objects included in the 18th century price-lists (limitatio). He identifies the cup of Tótvázsony made in 1761 as the work of Mihály Nánai, and attributes other art works appearing in the art trade to 18–19th century masters. The chief novelty in Nyitra is the attibution of 19th century works to the Szodomka family and János Ludvig.

Restricted access

Nachgotik és kora barokk – Brózer István kelyhéről

Nachgotik and early baroque – about István Brózer's chalice

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Erika Kiss

Abstract

The enamelled gold chalice made by the Kolozsvár goldsmith István Brózer is an emblematic and much-published work of Transylvanian goldsmithing. The communion cup made in 1641 was ordered by prince György I Rákóczi for the Calvinists of the Farkas street congregation, Kolozsvár. It is an outstanding relic not only for its material but also for the rich figural ornamentation of the cup. The narrative cycle depicts Christ's suffering from Easter Thursday to the Entombment. The graphic prototypes for the repoussé panels were 18 scenes in Adriaen Collaert's Passion published around 1610. The rich cloisonné and champlevé enamelling framing the scenes and covering the stem, node and foot attests to the experienced use of the cosses de pois decoration that evolved in the art of the Paris court in the 1630s. That was exactly where the master, István Brózer stayed during his peregrinations before reaching mastership.

The modern decorative program of the cup is paired with a highly conservative composition. There are two main gothicizing trends in Transylvanian goldsmiths' art in the early modern age. One can be interpreted as survival, when pattern sheets, forms, workshop traditions continuously lived on – in Transylvania up to the first third of the18th century. The historicist, revival or renovatio trend represented by the Brózer cup is more prevalent in Central European goldsmithing. For the liturgical vessels made in rising numbers again from the end of the 16th century the pre-Reformation style of the late gothic was the model in the Kingdom of Hungary and in the Transylvanian Principality.

István Brózer's chalice is almost the only high-quality goldsmith's piece testifying to the art patronage of the Transylvanian princely court.

Restricted access