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The drought tolerance of six green-and yellow-podded varieties of green beans with different genetic backgrounds was tested in the phytotron. During the week prior to flowering the plants were kept either at 25/15°C (day/night) or at high temperature (30/15°C), with RH 75% and optimum water supplies. The heat-stressed plants were then divided into three groups; the first was returned to the control (25/15°C) chamber (RH 75%, optimum water supplies), while the second and third were exposed to mild drought stress (RH 60%, 50% water) at temperatures of 30/15°C and 35/25°C, respectively, throughout the flowering period.The varieties survived the short period of heat stress (30/15°C) prior to flowering without damage provided the temperature during flowering was reduced to 25/15°C and the water supplies were optimum. There was a sharp increase in the carotene level in the leaves of drought-stressed plants when the temperature during flowering was 30/15°C, but in plants exposed to 35/25°C during flowering the level dropped to near the control level. The latter group exhibited considerable damage, with a reduction in the water-soluble antioxidant content (ACW: antioxidant capacity of water-soluble substances) and the chlorophyll b content compared with the control.The antioxidant content (ACW) in the dark green leaves of green-podded varieties was lower than in the yellow-podded varieties and did not change as the result of drought and heat stress. In yellow-podded varieties, however, there was a significant decline in ACW in response to stress. Differences between the varieties in their adaptability to drought and heat could be detected as changes in the chlorophyll and carotene contents of the leaves even at 30/15°C.

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. – Romero , L. : 2004 . Changes in biomass, enzymatic activity and protein concentration in roots and leaves of green bean plants ( Phaseolus vulgaris L . cv. Strike) under high NH 4 NO 3 application rates. Scientia Horticulturae. 99. 3–4 : 237 – 248

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Bourne, M. C. (1987): Effect of blanch temperature on kinetics of thermal softening of carrots and green beans. J. Fd Sci. , 52 , 667-668, 690. Effect of blanch temperature on kinetics of thermal softening of carrots and green

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, J. (2005): Study of lipoxygenase and peroxidase as indicator enzymes in green beans: change of enzyme activity, ascorbic acid and chlorophylls during frozen storage. J. Fd Engng , 66 , 187–192. Acar J

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Bourne, M. C. (1987): Effect of blanch temperature on kinetics of thermal softening of carrots and green beans. J. Fd Sci. , 52 , 667-668, 690. Effect of blanch temperature on kinetics

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659 665 Siegrist, J., Glenewinkel, D., Kolle, C. and Schmidtke, M. (1997): Chemically induced resistance in green bean against bacterial and fungal pathogens. J. Plant Dis

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. (2008) Yield and quality response of drip irrigated green beans under full and deficit irrigation. Sci Hort 117(2):95–102. Gencel B. Yield and quality response of drip irrigated

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period. Similar results were obtained for frozen/thawed green beans and carrots ( Redmond et al., 2004 ) and for dehydrofrozen/thawed melon. Indeed, colour of frozen/thawed melon previously air dehydrated was not influenced by frozen storage for 4 months

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Acta Chromatographica
Authors: Leonel Vinicius Constantino, Douglas Mariani Zeffa, Alessandra Koltun, Mariana Ragassi Urbano, Alisson Wilson Santos Sanzovo and Suzana Lucy Nixdorf

Introduction Coffee is known worldwide for its appreciable beverage, and Brazil is one of the largest producers and exporters of green beans, with a total production of 3,019,051 tons and an average yield of 15,135 kg/ha [ 1

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Acta Chromatographica
Authors: Lenche Velkoska-Markovska, Mirjana S. Jankulovska, Biljana Petanovska-Ilievska and Kristijan Hristovski

quality is strictly related to the chemical composition of the roasted beans, which is affected by the composition of the green beans and post-harvesting processing conditions [ 2 ]. Typical compounds in coffee, such as caffeine, trigonelline, and

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