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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Supissara Wongsuttawas, Pasakorn Brikshavana, Sumit Durongphongtorn, and Somporn Techangamsuwan

Introduction Haemangioma (HA) is among the most common benign splenic neoplasms and haemangiosarcoma (HSA) is the most common malignant endothelial neoplasm of the spleen in dogs ( Eberle et al., 2012 ). Splenic HSA frequently occurs in old-aged and

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Izabela Janus, Marcin Nowak, Agnieszka Noszczyk-Nowak, Rafał Ciaputa, Małgorzata Kandefer-Gola, Urszula Pasławska, Rafał Sapierzyński, Wojciech Łopuszyński, and Iwona Otrocka-Domagała

Primary heart tumours affect less than 1% of dogs. Due to their rare incidence, every research showing the frequency of cardiac tumours is valuable. Routine diagnostics is often complemented with immunohistochemical analysis. This study was conducted on 110 patient records from all veterinary faculties in Poland from dogs diagnosed with heart tumours between 1970 and 2014. The dogs’ age, breed and sex with tumour localisation and histopathological diagnosis were analysed. Because of its most common incidence, samples of haemangiosarcoma underwent further examination with assessment of the expression of cell markers that have not been evaluated earlier (i.e. minichromosome maintenance proteins and beta-catenin). We noted 111 tumours including 88.3% malignant and 10.8% benign ones. Haemangiosarcoma and aortic body tumour were the most frequent cardiac neoplasms in the dogs examined (45.9% and 27.9% of all tumours, respectively). Immunohistochemical analysis of haemangiosarcoma showed a positive expression of all markers examined. CD31, vimentin, and beta-catenin showed a positive reaction in all 11 samples examined. At least one proliferative marker (Ki-67, MCM-3 or MCM-7) showed a positive reaction in each sample. MCM-3 showed a higher expression than the two other proliferative markers (P = 0.006), but only Ki-67 showed a positive correlation with the mitotic index (P > 0.05, r = 0.89). Although beta-catenin, MCM-3 and MCM-7 showed a positive reaction in the haemangiosarcomas examined, their usefulness as diagnostic and prognostic factors should be a topic of further research.

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Haemangiosarcomas of dogs were analysed by molecular genetic techniques. Regions of the tumour suppressor gene p53, including the well-known tumour hot spots (codons 175, 245, 248, 249, 273 and 282) were screened. A 24 bp deletion was detected in exon 5 of the gene.

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Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause a variety of neoplasms, including mainly myeloid leukosis (myelocytomatosis) and nephromas. Other tumours, such as histiocytic sarcoma (HS), haemangiosarcoma and mesothelioma, may also develop. In a previous article we described a case in which myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas and leiomyosarcomas appeared simultaneously in a commercial layer flock with infection by ALV-J. The present research was completed to understand the molecular characteristics of the ALV-J strain that induced clinical myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas and leiomyosarcomas. Two strains of ALV-J (SDAU1001 and SDAU1002) were isolated and identified, and their full-length sequences were analysed. The complete genome nucleotide sequences of these two isolates were different in length, 7652 nt and 7636 nt, respectively. They shared 98.9% identity with each other, and 93.4% to 97.8% nucleotide identity to the reference ALV-J isolates. A 19-nucleotide repeat sequence was identified in the primer binding site (PBS) leader region of isolate SDAU1001. A base substitution mutation (base 15 C-T) in this insertion was identified. However, the identical insertion at the same site was not found in SDAU1002. The gag and pol genes of the two viruses were more conserved than the env gene. One key deletion in the E element was a common feature of SDAU1001 and SDAU1002. SDAU1001 and SDAU1002, possibly recombinants of ALV-J and another avian retrovirus, may share the same ancestor. Co-infection by SDAU1001 and SDAU1002 isolates is a possible explanation why myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas, and leiomyosarcomas appeared simultaneously in the same commercial layer flock.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Itzel Y. Rangel-Sánchez, Daniel Salas-Treviño, Adolfo Soto-Domínguez, Oscar I. Garza-Rodríguez, Odila Saucedo-Cárdenas, Pablo Zapata-Benavides, Juan J. Zarate-Ramos, Sibilina Cedillo-Rosales, and Diana E. Zamora-Ávila

frequency. These tumours have very high incidence, compared to other less common tumours present in horses, such as cutaneous lymphoma, mastocytoma and haemangiosarcoma ( Schaffer et al., 2012 ). To facilitate the diagnosis of melanoma in equines, the

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