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. Crick , S. J. , Sheppard , M. N. , Ho , S. Y. , Gebstein , L. and Anderson , R. H. ( 1998 ): Anatomy of the pig heart: comparisons with normal human cardiac structure . J. Anat. 193 , 105 – 119

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Buckett, K. J., Dockray, G. J., Osborne, N. N., Benjamin, P. R. (1990) Pharmacology of the myogenic heart of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnali . J. Neurophysiol. 63 , 1413–1425. Benjamin P. R

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proteins and their role in heart injury. Curr. Opin. Crit. Care 8 , 411–416. Famularo G. Heat shock proteins and their role in heart injury Curr. Opin

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Naszlady A.: Cardiopulmonalis kölcsönhatások és következményeik. Doktori értekezés. Budapest, 1979. Naszlady, A., Kiss, L.: Regularity in heart rate of mammals. Cybernetic Medicine, 1969, 4 , 17

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377 399 Brooks GA, White TP: Determination of metabolic and heart rate responses of rats to treadmill exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 45, 1009-1015 (1978

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel, Luis Francisco Sánchez-Anguiano, Alejandra Mendoza-Larios, Jesús Hernández-Tinoco, José Francisco Pérez-Ochoa, Elizabeth Irasema Antuna-Salcido, Elizabeth Rábago-Sánchez, and Oliver Liesenfeld

, Siciliano RF , Vidal Campos S , Bianchi Castelli J , Bacal F , Bocchi EA , Uip DE : Toxoplasma gondii myocarditis after adult heart transplantation: successful prophylaxis with pyrimethamine . J Trop Med 2012 , 853562 ( 2012

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: C. G. Mothé, T. Carestiato, M. B. Aguila, and C. A. Mandarim-de-Lacerda

Summary Hypertension is a major and growing public health problem. It is responsible for the mortality of millions of people around world, and is increasing each year. Nevertheless, the understanding of the relationship between the composition of the heart's cells, hypertension and health diseases is still very incomplete. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the attributes of some hearts of Spontaneous Hypertension Rats (SHR), comparing with SHR which received additional amounts of polysaccharide (SHR+P) and with wistar rats (normal blood pressure) by Thermal Analysis. Some differences could be seen between groups, as the residue content after 800°C was different for rats from different groups, and of wistar rats hearts samples showed 5.3±0.3& of residues vs. 8.3±1.5& of the SHR. DSC profiles for wistar rats showed one intense endothermic event at 160°C, with enthalpy transition of 450 J g-1 and more three small events. Thermal analyses curves also showed some differences between freezing and no freezing samples, probably associated to the denaturation of proteins and degradation of organic materials.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: MM Petrovic, D Dekanski, A Isakovic, L Scepanovic, and DM Mitrovic

The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of transport of 3-deazaguanine in the rat heart. We used single-pass, paired-tracer dilution method on isolated and retrogradely perfused rat hearts. The maximal cellular uptake (Umax) and total cellular uptake (Utot) of 3-deazaguanine were determined under control conditions and under influence of possible modifiers. Both Umax and Utot were significantly reduced in the presence of unlabeled 3-deazaguanine (from 19.57±2.02% to 8.14±1.19% and from 16.49±3.65% to 4.70±1.96%, n=6, respectively). The presence of pyrimidine nucleoside thymidine caused the reduction of both Umax and Utot (from 20.03±3.76% to 13.58±3.16% and from 16.43±3.58% to 11.94±3.13%, n=6, respectively). Also, we tested the effect of the absence of sodium ions in perfusion solution (both Umax and Utot significantly reduced from 17.95±2.73% to 16.67±2.16% and from 16.68±2.97% to 14.81±3.04%, n=6, respectively) and the effect of dinitrophenol (both Umax and Utot significantly reduced from 19.09±3.68% to 10.58±3.14% and from 16.86±3.84% to 7.10±3.11%, n=6, respectively). The results of self- and cross-inhibition studies show that the transport of 3-deazaguanine is saturable, energy- and sodium-dependent and that 3-deazaguanine uses endogenous transport systems for thymidine and adenosine for its own transport.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: Z Kojić, Z Kojić, Z Kojić, Lj Šćepanović, Lj Šćepanović, Lj Šćepanović, N Popović, N Popović, and N Popović

In our previous work we have shown that in mouse heart basal level of endothelial produced nitrite, as a marker of nitric oxide (NO) formation, was 9.7 nmol l-1. Bradykinin (10 mmol l-1) induced a 5-fold rise in nitrite release, the coronary venous effluent concentration being 58 nmol l-1, but there was no effect on myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2). The aim of this study was to assess the levels of authentic nitric oxide solution, exogenously applied, on myocardial oxygen consumption. Isolated mouse hearts (n=36) were paced (500 imp./min) and perfused at constant flow (16.0±0.3 ml g-1 min-1). When coronary vasculature resistance was carefully controlled by adenosine (1 mmol l-1), authentic nitric oxide solution, in a concentration less than 5 mmol l-1 did not alter myocardial oxygen consumption. Only concentrations of nitric oxide higher than 5 mmol l-1 induced reduction in myocardial oxygen consumption. Thus in the saline perfused mouse heart, with carefully controlled vasodilatation, modulating myocardial nitric oxide levels using an arterial application of authentic nitric oxide, concentrations higher than 5 mmol l-1 of nitric oxide were required to induce a decrease in myocardial oxygen consumption.

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Two experiments were performed to evaluate the normal development of the rabbit heart. In the first experiment the most intensive period of heart development was determined in rabbit embryos. The second experiment studied the most intensive period of heart development, determined in the first experiment, by concentrated sampling at 8-hour intervals. After cutting open the uterine wall opposite the discoid placenta, rabbit embryos were removed from the ampullae of the uterus using capillary tubes, under stereomicroscope at fivefold magnification. The embryos were subsequently placed into 4% formalin solution for 24 h. After fixation, slides stained with haematoxylin and eosin were made for histological examination. In the first experiment 51 embryos were examined, while during the second experiment a total of 113 embryos, representing different stages of development, were collected. Finally the data obtained on rabbits were compared with the well-known development of the heart in humans and mice.

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