Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 25 items for :

  • "hydration heat" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Abstract  

The present study is based on the influence of the addition of a pozzolanic material as a result of the activation of an industrial waste coming from the Spanish paper industry on the heating as well as hydration heat of the cement mortars made with 10 or 20% of active addition. Once the sludge has been calcined at different temperatures (700–800°C) and stays in furnace (2 and 5 h), the calcined products showed high pozzolanic activity. The maximum activity corresponded to the paper sludge calcined at 700°C for 2 h (S1). Besides, it can be proved that there was an increase both of the heating and also of the hydration heat in the first 23–25 h for both additions (10 and 20% of S1) regarding the reference cement mortar. This behaviour would be related to the influence of different effects: filler and pozzolanic during the first hours of reaction, and by the dilution effect for longer hydration times, mainly when 20% of S1 was added.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The heats of hydration reactions for MgCl2⋅4H2O and MgCl2⋅2H2O include two parts, reaction enthalpy and adsorption heat of aqueous vapor on the surfaces of magnesium chloride hydrates. The hydration heat for the reactions MgCl2⋅4H2O+2H2O→MgCl2⋅6H2O and MgCl2⋅2H2O+2H2O→MgCl2⋅4H2O, measured by DSC-111, is –30.36 and –133.94 kJ mol–1,respectively. The adsorption heat of these hydration processes, measured by head-on chromatography method, is –13.06 and –16.11 kJ mol–1, respectively. The molar enthalpy change for the above two reactions is –16.64 and –118.09 kJ mol–1, respectively. The comparison between the experimental data and the theoretical values for these hydration processes indicates that the results obtained in this study are quite reliable.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Thermal phenomena at the hydration of calcium sulphate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5H2O) are investigated in the paper. Time development of hydration heat of β-calcium sulphate hemihydrate prepared from flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum is determined using two different types of calorimeter, namely the differential calorimeter DIK 04 and the isothermal heat flow calorimeter KC 01, and the differences in measured data analyzed. Then, the effects of plasticizers and hydrophobizers on the hydration process of analyzed gypsum mixtures are studied.

Restricted access

, researchers have rarely investigated the hydration heat of fly ash and fluorgypsum co-doped cement. The hydration of cement is an exothermic reaction, which can result in serious problem for mass concrete: The interior of the concrete could reach very

Restricted access

Abstract  

The calorimetric data of binders containing pure Portland cement, 20% fly ash, 20% slag and 10% silica fume respectively are determined at different initial casting temperatures using an adiabatic calorimeter to measure the adiabatic temperature rising of concrete. The calorimetric data of binders with different dosages of fly ash at two water binder ratios (w/b) are determined, too. Elevation of initial casting temperature decreases the heat evolution of binder, enhances the heat evolution rate of binder and increases the heat evolution rate of binder at early age. The dosage of fly ash in concrete has different effects on the heat evolution of binder with different w/b. At high w/b ratio the heat evolution of binder decreases when dosage of fly ash increases. At low w/b ratio the heat evolution of binders increases when dosage of fly ash increases from 0 to 40% of total binder quantity. The heat evolution of binder decreases after the dosage of fly ash over 40%. An appropriate dosage of fly ash in binder benefits the performance of concrete at low w/b ratio.

Restricted access

Abstract  

This work presents the relation between the pozzolanic activity, the hydration heat and the compressive strength developed by blended mortars containing 10 and 35% of a spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC). The results show that, in comparison with 100% Portland cement mortar, a mortar with 10% FCC increases the hydration heat all over the period of testing. This hydration heat increasing is due to the pozzolanic effect, therefore the resulting compressive strength is higher than the reference mortar. Whereas, in a mortar with 35% of FCC, the hydration heat is higher than 100% PC mortar, until 10 h of testing. After this age, the substitution degree predominates over the pozzolanic activity, showing in this case, lower hydration heat and developing lower compressive strength than 100% PC mortar.

Restricted access

evolution of the hydration heat. This occurs almost immediately after adding water according to the equation (3) The hydration of β-anhydrite III is completed within several minutes and, subsequently, the hydration of β-hemihydrate to dihydrate begins, (4

Restricted access

which are measured in physical and chemical laboratories using calorimetric techniques. In engineering laboratories, hydration heat of cementitious systems belongs to the class of most extensively studied parameters. Isothermal [ 10 ], isoperibolic [ 11

Restricted access

Parametric studies In this part, the calibrated FE model is used to perform parametric studies to evaluate the effect of hydration heat, ambient temperature and casting temperature on temperature variations, and crack behavior of early age concrete

Restricted access