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. Bergman , P. J. , Ogilvie , G. K. and Powers , B. E. ( 1996 ): Monoclonal antibody C219 immunohistochemistry against P-glycoprotein: sequential analysis and predictive ability in dogs with lymphoma . J. Vet. Intern. Med. 10 , 354 – 359

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Csaba Jakab, Judit Halász, András Kiss, Zsuzsa Schaff, Attila Szász, Miklós Rusvai, Zsolt Abonyi Tóth and Janina Kulka

Kohlberger, P. D., Obermair, A., Sliutz, G., Koelbl, H., Breitenecker, G., Gitsch, G. and Kainz, C. (1996): Quantitative immunohistochemistry of factor VIII-related antigen in breast carcinoma. Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 105 , 705

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel, Luis Francisco Sánchez-Anguiano, Alejandra Mendoza-Larios, Jesús Hernández-Tinoco, José Francisco Pérez-Ochoa, Elizabeth Irasema Antuna-Salcido, Elizabeth Rábago-Sánchez and Oliver Liesenfeld

The presence of tissue cysts of Toxoplasma gondii has only poorly been investigated in autopsy series. We determined the presence of T. gondii cysts in a series of 51 autopsies in a public hospital using immunohistochemistry of brain and heart tissues. The association of tissue cysts with the general characteristics of the autopsy cases was also investigated.

Of the 51 cases studied, five (9.8%) were positive by immunohistochemistry for T. gondii cysts in the brain. None of the heart specimens was positive for T. gondii cysts. The presence of T. gondii cysts in brains did not vary with age, sex, birthplace, residence, education, occupation, or the presence of pathology in the brain. In contrast, multivariate analysis showed that the presence of T. gondii cysts was associated with undernourishment (OR = 33.90; 95% CI: 2.82–406.32; P = 0.005).

We demonstrated cerebral T. gondii cysts in an autopsy series in Durango City, Mexico. Results suggest that T. gondii can be more readily found in brain than in heart of infected individuals. This is the first report of an association between the presence of T. gondii in brains and undernourishment.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Csaba Jakab, Attila Szász, Janina Kulka, Ferenc Baska, Miklós Rusvai, Péter Gálfi and Tibor Németh

, A., Schaff, Zs., Szász, A. M., Rusvai, M., Abonyi, T. Zs. and Kulka, J. (2008): Evaluation of microvessel density (MVD) in canine mammary tumours by quantitative immunohistochemistry of the claudin-5 molecule. Acta Vet. Hung. 56 , 495

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, followed by Sasso broilers. Immunohistochemistry ND antigen was detected in the different tissues with strong positive peroxidase reaction involving the trachea ( Fig. 4a ), lung tissue ( Fig. 4b ), proventriculus ( Fig. 4c ), pancreas ( Fig. 4d ), liver

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, followed by Sasso broilers. Immunohistochemistry ND antigen was detected in the different tissues with strong positive peroxidase reaction involving the trachea ( Fig. 4a ), lung tissue ( Fig. 4b ), proventriculus ( Fig. 4c ), pancreas ( Fig. 4d ), liver

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The aim of experiments was to characterize the neurons of the autonomic chain that innervates the nipple and the mammary gland of lactating rats using retrograde transynaptic virus labeling and neurotransmitter and neuropeptide immunohistochemistry. Two days after injection of green fluorescence protein labeled virus in two nipples and underlying mammary glands, labeling was observed in the ipsilateral paravertebral sympathetic trunk and the lateral horn. Three days after inoculation the labeling appeared in the brain stem and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Above the spinal cord the labeling was bilateral. A subpopulation of virus labeled cells in the paraventricular nuclei synthesized oxytocin. Labeled neurons in the lateral horn showed cholinergic immunoreactivity. These cholinergic neurons innervated the paravertebral ganglia where the virus labeled neurons were partially noradrenergic. The noradrenergic fibers in the mammary gland innervate the smooth muscle wall of vessels, but not the mammary gland in rats. The neurons in the lateral horn receive afferents from the brain stem, and paraventricular nucleus and these afferents are noradrenergic and oxytocinergic. New findings in our work: Some oxytocinergic fibers may descend to the neurons of the lateral horn which innervate noradrenergic neurons in the paravertebral sympathetic trunk, and in turn these noradrenergic neurons reach the vessels of the mammary gland.

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Rimstad, E. and Evensen, O. 1993: The identification of equid herpesvirus 1 in paraffinembedded tissues from aborted fetuses by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. J. Vet. Diagn. Invest. 5 , 174-183. The

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Background

Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) is a tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in human tumors. Interestingly, the normal pattern of FHIT expression is largely unknown.

Aim

This study is aimed to characterize the expression of FHIT protein in normal human tissues.

Materials and methods

A total of 119 normal human tissue specimens were analyzed for the FHIT expression using immunohistochemistry technique. The inclusion criteria included: normal/inflammatory tissue with no evidence of cellular atypia.

Results

All studied specimens were stained positively with FHIT and showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic expression. Interestingly, the pattern of FHIT staining was similar among different specimens from each organ. FHIT is located predominantly in the nucleus, although cytoplasmic staining is also present in some cell types. Oral squamous epithelium, breast ductal epithelium, squamous and tubal metaplastic epithelium of the uterine cervix, esophageal squamous epithelium, salivary glands, and bronchial epithelia all strongly expressed the nuclear protein. In connective tissue, FHIT has shown strong cytoplasmic expression in histocytes including macrophages and dendritic cells, fibroblasts, and myofibroblasts.

Conclusion

Documentation of the pattern of FHIT expression in normal tissues will contribute to our understanding of the normal function of this protein and to interpretation of potentially altered FHIT expression in human tumors.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Carmen Solcan, Geta Pavel, Viorel Floristean, Ioan Chiriac, Bogdan Şlencu and Gheorghe Solcan

The immunotoxic effect of ochratoxin A (OTA) on the intestinal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and its cytotoxic action on the intestinal epithelium were studied in broiler chickens experimentally treated with the toxin. From the 7th day of life, 80 male broiler chickens (Ross 308) were randomly divided into four groups of 20 birds each. The three experimental groups (E1-3) were treated with OTA for 28 days (E1: 50 μg/kg body weight [bw]/day; E2: 20 μg/kg bw/day; E3: 1 μg/kg bw/day) and the fourth group served as control. Histological examination of the intestinal mucosa and immunohistochemical staining for identification of CD4+, CD8+, TCR1 and TCR2 lymphocytes in the duodenum, jejunum and ileocaecal junction were performed, and CD4+/CD8+ and TCR1/TCR2 ratios were calculated. OTA toxicity resulted in decreased body weight gain, poorer feed conversion ratio, lower leukocyte and lymphocyte count, and altered intestinal mucosa architecture. After 14 days of exposure to OTA, immunohistochemistry showed a significant reduction of the lymphocyte population in the intestinal epithelium and the lamina propria. After 28 days of exposure, an increase in the CD4+ and CD8+ values in both the duodenum and jejunum of chickens in Groups E1 and E2 was observed, but the TCR1 and TCR2 lymphocyte counts showed a significant reduction. No significant changes were observed in Group E3. The results indicate that OTA induced a decrease in leukocyte and lymphocyte counts and was cytotoxic to the intestinal epithelium and the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, altering the intestinal barrier and increasing susceptibility to various associated diseases.

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