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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: S. Maghraoui, Simona Clichici, A. Ayadi, C. Login, R. Moldovan, D. Daicoviciu, N. Decea, A. Mureşan, and L. Tekaya

EA, Yamauchi H, Fowler BA: Alterations in the heme biosynthetic pathway from the III-V semiconductor metal, indium arsenide (InAs). Chem. Biol. Interact. 96, 273–285 (1995) Fowler BA Alterations in the heme biosynthetic

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Abstract  

The melting and crystallization of a sharply melting standard has been explored for the calibration of temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, TMDSC. Modulated temperature and heat flow have been followed during melting and crystallization of indium. It is observed that indium does not supercool as long as crystal nuclei remain in the sample when analyzing quasi-isothermally with a small modulation amplitude. For standard differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, the melting and crystallization temperatures of indium are sufficiently different not to permit its use for calibration on cooling, unless special analysis modes are applied. For TMDSC with an underlying heating rate of 0.2 K min−1 and a modulation amplitude of 0.5–1.5 K at periods of 30–90 s, the extrapolated onsets of melting and freezing were within 0.1 K of the known melting temperature of indium. Further work is needed to separate the effects originating from loss of steady state between sample and sensor on the one hand and from supercooling on the other.

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Abstract  

The kinetics of thermal decomposition of solid In(S2CNR2)3 complexes, (R=CH3, C2H5, n-C3H7,i-C3H7, n-C4H9 and i-C4H9), has been studied using isothermal and non-isothermal thermogravimetry. Superimposed TG/DTG/DSC curves show that thermal decomposition reactions occur in the liquid phase, except for the In(S2CNMe2)3 and In(S2CNPri 2)3 compounds.

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work is a continuation of our previous studies whereby we expand the list of the metal sulfides with indium sulfide (In 2 S 3 ). In 2 S 3 thin films deposited by the CSP method have been used as a buffer layer instead of CdS in chalcopyrite

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Abstract  

A paper chromatographic procedure is described for distinguishing complexed and uncomplexed indium in solutions resulting from the extraction of indium-111 with oxine (8-quinolinol).

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Iwona Zięborak-Tomaszkiewicz, R. Świerzewski, and P. Gierycz

Abstract  

The heat capacity of the solid indium nitride was measured, using the Calvet TG-DSC 111 differential scanning microcalorimeter (Setaram, France), in the temperature between (314–978 K). The temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be presented in the following form: C p=41.400+0.499·10−3 T−135502T −2−26169900 T −3.

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Abstract  

The activation of indium by gamma-ray source through absorption of photons of resonance energy and the threshold energy (appearance energy) determination in indium compounds as well as some results of hot atom chemistry studies of indium compounds and of implantation with indium ions are described.

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Abstract  

The extraction and extraction-chromatographic behavior of many elements in the tributylphosphate — HBr solution system has been studied. The investigation performed has made it possible to develop a simple technique for neutron activation determination of 22 impurity elements in high purity indium samples with detection limits from 0.1 ppm for Fe and Zr to 0.01 ppb for Na, Sc, Cu, As, La and W.

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indium-based multi-component chalcogenide glasses. Material preparation High purity (99.999 %) Se, Te, Cd and In elements in appropriate atomic percentages were weighed by electronic balance and put into a quartz ampoule (5-cm

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Summary  

Indium hydroxides were prepared by the mixing of aqueous indium nitrate solution with sodium or ammonium hydroxide solutions under various conditions. The thermal decomposition of the resulting materials was examined by thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction study and infrared spectroscopy. It has been found that sodium hydroxide solution is more suitable than the addition of ammonium hydroxide solution to prepare indium hydroxide in well crystallization; the thermal decomposition of indium hydroxide, in which the composition is In(OH)3 xH2O where x2, proceeds according to the following process: In(OH)3 xH2Ocubic In(OH)3cubic In2O3

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