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Scientometrics
Authors:
Valentina Markusova
,
R. Gilyarevskii
,
A. Chernyi
, and
Belver Griffith

Without Abstract

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Although not always labeled as such, information literacy has been implicitly recognized as a key aspect of translation competence by practitioners, teachers, and scholars. Yet, researchers have only recently begun to systematically examine information behavior in the translation processes of students and professionals to determine how translation-centered information literacy develops. The questions of how and whether translators use the tools and resources at their disposal and how students, novices, and professionals differ in this regard remain to be investigated in detail. The multi-method approach we use to analyze translation competence and information behavior combines data from ethnographic observation of the translation situation, surveys, semi-structured interviews, keystroke logging, computer screenshot recordings, concurrent and cue-based retrospective verbalizations of recorded translation processes, and eye-tracking. We report on the initial phases and results of a study on translators’ information behavior to indicate how this type of research can contribute to understanding the development of translation competence and to improving information literacy teaching.

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Abstract  

A small written survey with innovation engineers in a large company is discussed, giving some figures on both behaviour and attitudes with respect to 1) information gathering, 2) information production/dissemination and 3) information storage and management. Most results confirm the trends in other research with R & D engineers: the use and management of information is rather improvised with low levels of sophistication. High tech information techniques (databases, online...) are only marginally important in this high-tech environment. Only younger engineers do some structured efforts. The general attitude is to rely mostly on oral, personal and occasional information sources. By combining positive attitudes and behaviour aspects towards information in the job, a measure of information-orientation was constructed, which can be seen as an extension of the classical concept of gate-keepers in a company. A few questions to reconstruct a critical incident with respect to information problems reveal that information situations can be very time- and money-consuming but again solutions depend on occasional and unstructured information work. However the restricted written approach did not prove to be a good one for this kind of analysis. More in-depth interview-techniques will be necessary for analysis within the critical incident theory-frame.

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References [1] Savolainen R. ( 2007 ), Information behavior and information practice: Reviewing the “Umbrella Concepts

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recently published research. First and foremost, it is the use of the analytical information that calls for most scrutiny. Additionally, an interesting aspect to be investigated is the information behavior of the expert groups themselves . The different

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): Categorical perception of facial gender information: Behavioural evidence and face-space metaphor. Visual Cognition , 8 , 237–262. Bruyer R Categorical perception of facial gender

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) Information Retrieval Interaction Ingwersen, P. – – 5 (17) Theories of Information Behavior

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, “information behavior” (original tag is informationbehavior), and “co-citation”. Figure 1b shows that distribution of tag categories also follows the Zipfian power-law distribution. Among the categories, 01, 09 and 12 are the three most popularly used

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underlying informational behavioral from this insight (Hjørland and Albrechtsen 1995 ). The objects of domain visualization not only involve the entire science but also a specific discipline (Garfield 1998 ; White and McCain 1998 ). The combination

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because it promises direct efficiency gains for individual and social actions (indirect efficiency gains and social progress can be expected from the support of information behaviour). The successful development of third-generation literacy

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