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References Cited Csonka-Takacs , Eszter 2010 The Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage in Service of our Living and Surviving Tradition - Task and Opportunities in Hungary . In Hoppal , Mihaly (ed

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Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. Museum International , 56(1–2): 140. Republic of South Africa Aikawa N. An historical overview of the protection of the UNESCO International Convention for the Safeguarding of the

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-Taylor and Francis Group . H ooper -C reenhill , Eilean 2000 : Museums and the Interpretation of Visual Culture . London : Routledge . ICTM 2008 : Intangible Cultural Heritage — Mediation of Knowledge or Nationalistic Competition . In

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Ethnographical Heritage: Symbolic Capital. UNESCO’s position on the protection of intangible cultural heritage, set out in the form of international treaties, bears witness to noble intentions. At the same time, in the various countries the disciplines dealing with subjects that can be classified under the concept of heritage interpret the notion of “heritage” in different ways. Ethnology in particular is in a special situation in those countries where from the 19th century popular culture played a part in constructing and maintaining the national culture. Right from the start the intention of maintaining tradition, assistance for this and the study of the processes of change themselves were part of this work of construction. This research tradition is itself an “intangible cultural heritage”. Hungarian ethnology, that has been familiar with and assisted many forms of the preservation of the values of popular culture for more than a century now has elaborated a set of concepts and theoretical considerations that cannot be identified unequivocally with the texts of UNESCO. Seeing the overview of the international literature, we also wish to encourage ethnologists to discuss considerations, concepts and practices that represent views differing from their own research traditions. This is part of the development of the discipline.

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At the beginning of the 1970s there was a drastic turn in the history of Hungarian folklorism brought by the ‘dance house’ [táncház] movement. This movement, based on civil initiative, aimed to evoke and revive the patterns of peasant dance and music culture of local communities, preserving its aesthetic values. Within its confines, many young people followed the example of the initiators, Ferenc Sebő and Béla Halmos through the intensive appropriation of instrumental folk music. Their professional leaders were such folklore researchers as Lajos Vargyas, Imre Olsvai, and György Martin, later the amateur activity ignoring scientific requirements came to play a determinant role. (N.B. the “dance house method” was inscribed in 2011 on UNESCO’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.) As an urban subculture rooted in the peasant traditional culture, it expanded independently from the centrally supervised cultural establishment — without the control of the communist party. It seemed to be dangerous from ideological point of view, because it could have involved the ideas of nationalism, liberty, and self-organized communities as well.

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As a cultural movement with a global reach, hip-hop and its assimilation outside America draws discourse from globalised perspectives. At the same time, African-American vernacular dances such as breaking, krumping, locking, vogue among others, often classified under hip-hop or street dance, have received scholarly attention in the past few years. This project is concerned with how hip-hop and street dance freestyle improvisations are shaped and localized in a post-American-colonial setting. Based on a two-month fieldwork in Manila, Philippines, this research analyzes the All Styles Battle as a convergence of various assimilated movement systems, and local dance practice. The methods implemented in gathering data include formal and informal interviews, and participant observation. This paper draws out evidences of the recurring negotiations between practicing pure versus hybridized versions of hip-hop and street dance genres with the help of movement analysis. By incorporating elements such as ‘Burns’, dancers in Manila are able to adapt modified versions of street dance genres to activities such as battling in street dance. As such, this research also touches on pertinent issues within hip-hop discourse as it aims for a deeper understanding of cultural production, assimilation, authenticity and intangible cultural heritage.

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of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage: Nomination File No. 00425 for inscription on the representative list of the intangible cultural heritage in 2010. http

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emlékezve . folkMAGazin 4 , 44 – 45 . Available online: http://folkmagazin.hu/flipbook/index.php?file=mag03_4 UNESCO 2011 : Táncház Method: A Hungarian Model for the Transmission of Intangible Cultural Heritage . Available online: http

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“There is no nation without history, there is no family without a family tree”

On Sibe ethnic nationalist aspirations through the example of a “family tree unification” story

Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Author: Ildikó Gyöngyvér Sárközi

Minorities]. Beijing 北京 , Minzu Chubanshe 民族出版社 . T ongjia Qingfu 佟加庆夫 - WEN Jian 文健 2009 Xibozu feiwuzhi wenhua yichan daibiaozuo 锡伯族-一物质文化遗产代表 作[Sibe Intangible Cultural Heritage List]. Wulumuqi Xinjiang Renmin Chubanshe新疆人民出版社 . U ray -K

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Heritage over the last ten years, research topics devoted to various aspects of safeguarding traditional village dances considered to be national intangible cultural heritage are given preferential treatment in both academic circles and by the wider public

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