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Authors: Abraham P. Buunk and Odette van Brummen-Girigori

Scituate, MA : Duxbury Press , pp. 436 – 453 . Bringle , R. G. ( 1991 ). Psychosocial aspects of jealousy: A transactional model . In: P. Salovey (Ed.), The psychology of jealousy and envy . New York : Guilford , pp. 103 – 131 . Brown , S

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sex differences in jealousy context-dependent? Zeitschrift für Sozialpsychologie , 35, 107-114. Priming of AIDS and reactions to infidelity: Are sex differences in jealousy context

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763 778 Brewer, G. and Riley, C. (2009): Height, relationship satisfaction, jealousy and mate retention. Evolutionary Psychology , 7, 477

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J Miller T Vaillancourt 2012 Jealousy mediates the relationship between attractiveness comparison and females’ indirect aggression

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Introduction Oh, beware, my lord, of jealousy! It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock. The meat it feeds on . -Shakespeare

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Evolutionary theory based research shows that women and men may differ in their responses to sexual and emotional infidelity. The present research sought to determine how the mate value characteristics of rivals affect the levels of emotional reaction men and women experience with these types of infidelity. Women were expected to report higher levels of upset when their male partners committed infidelity with an attractive rather than an unattractive woman while men were expected to experience the most upset when their female partners committed sexual infidelity with a male rival regardless of the rival's financial status. The results were partially consistent with these hypotheses. Women were most upset by their partner's sexual infidelity regardless of the attractiveness of their female rival and more upset by their partner's emotional infidelity with an attractive woman. Men were most upset with their partner's commission of sexual infidelity regardless of the financial status of their male rival. These findings are discussed in terms of prior research examining sex differences in jealousy and intrasexual competition.

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An evolutionary approach to social cognition yields novel hypotheses about the perception of people belonging to specific kinds of social categories. These implications are illustrated by empirical results linking the perceived threat of physical injury to stereotypical impressions of outgroups. We review a set of studies revealing several ways in which threat-connoting cues influence perceptions of ethnic outgroups and the individuals who belong to those outgroups. We also present new results that suggest additional implications of evolved danger-avoidance mechanisms on interpersonal communication and the persistence of cultural-level stereotypes about ethnic outgroups. The conceptual utility of an evolutionary approach is further illustrated by a parallel line of research linking the threat of disease to additional kinds of social perceptions and behaviors. Evolved danger-avoidance mechanisms appear to contribute in diverse ways to individual-level cognitive processes, as well as to culturally-shared collective beliefs.

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5 325 383 . J. F. Bassett 2005 Sex differences in jealousy in response to a partner's imagined sexual or emotional

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Deviances of information society

About harassment and cyber-stalking

Author: Zoltán Szathmáry

The fact of harassment is a remarkable step in the complex protection of private sphere, but due to its novelty it is still difficult to adopt in practice. Among the most typical behaviours of harassment, the Criminal Code itself names the commitment through telecommunication tools that-referring to the title-means harassment through internet as an infocommunication system. The modern, digital communication facilities enable an informal communication among participants that hides reality. The single ways of communication (e-mail, chat) only have written basis, other sensors of cognition, perception do not play any role. As a result of the lack of social controll, one of the most significant hurdles of aggression, the social distress does not exist. Therefore some emotions (anger, jealousy) or aggression can be directed straight towards the target of the harassor. The internet can be a tool as well that the principal can use in order to gather personal information about the victim to make the subsequent harassment easier. These circumstances provide different opportunities to the harassor, therefore it is worth to deal detailed with this way of commitment. The suggestions and highlights of the study aim to eliminate the difficulties of law interpretation, to define the enforceable concept of private life, and to enable the possible realisation of the facts.

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Authors: T. Joel Wade, Ryan Palmer, Mike DiMaria, Courtnay Johnson and Megan Multack

.J. Larsen D. Westen J. Semmelroth 1992 Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology

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