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-összehasonlító vizsgálatok és gyakorlati fejlesztések az ördögszekér laskagomba [Pleurotus eryngii (DC. Fr.) Quél.] termesztésében (Strain comparative examinations and practical developments in the king oyster mushroom [Pleurotus eryngii (DC. Fr.) Quél.] cultivation). PhD

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. Catalogue Budapest 2008 Matthias Corvinus, the King: Tradition and Renewal in the Hungarian Royal Court, 1458–1490 , exhibition catalogue , Budapesti Történeti Múzeum , Budapest . Eds. Farbaky , Péter et al. Budapest

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Robert, S. (2005). King Abdullah II: “Iraq is the Battleground — the West against Iran”. Middle East Quarterly , 12(2): 73–80. Robert S. King Abdullah II: “Iraq is the Battleground

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The folklore surrounding the figure of King Matthias offers an illuminating example of the international nature of both the culture of the Renaissance and folklore itself. The following paper offers an overview of the history of much of the research and scholarship concerning the figure of the king in European folklore (particularly the folklore traditions of Central Europe), followed by a discussion of the historical layers of inter-ethnic (international) Matthias folklore.

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This paper scrutinizes a textually controverted passage of the Pindaric corpus. Previous attempts to solve the problem are reviewed and their shortcomings pointed out. The interpunction of Rose (1939) is adopted, yet with a minor conjecture (ἔχει〈ς〉) and a new interpretation of the metaphor ὀφΘαλμός. Beyond the textual improvement my aim is to contribute to the understanding of this very motif of intriguing complexity: the eye of the king.

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Summary

The paper analyses the textual and visual representations of King Matthias Corvinus in the light of Antique physiognomical theories. I intend to focus mainly on those descriptions and portraits which were influenced by the lion's physiognomy. The last chapter deals also with the portraits of Matthias, but with the Attila-faun-like images. The Antique theories of physiognomy have contributed to a more exact interpretation of his images and the physiognomical comparison has resulted a more shaded picture about his iconography, even in the case of the Attila-faun-type portraits where we cannot study such clear-cut intentions. Due to the research we can place plausibly the leonine images of King Matthias among the Renaissance state-portraits after having taken into consideration the king's political intentions as well. The examination of the sources has resulted that the role of Galeotto Marzio must have been crucial in mediating the physiognomical theories towards the Buda court. I have also demonstrated that in his work physiognomy appears as an element of the theoriesrelated to good governance.

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Contrary to earlier assumptions, the rich burial in qurgan no. 3 at Üc Tepe cannot be the inhumation of a Sabir or Avar warrior or that of a Persian officer. According to the testimony of the inscribed golden signet ring, whose legend runs as follows: Silig i abarzeniganbed “Silig the commander of the guards of the royal tent”, the burial belonged to a Turk nobleman, Silig by name, who entered the service of Xusro I Šahanšah and was appointed by him to commander of the guards of his general headquarters. The Karnamag of Xusro I mentions two settlements of Turkic tribes in Iran in 540/541 A.D. and 568 A.D. Very likely it was the latter one in the course of which the Turk chief entered the military service of the Persian king.

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This study deals with Celtis’ practice of rewriting and recontextualizing his own poetry. His poem To the literary odality of Hungarians (Ad sodalitatem litterariam Ungarorum, Odes II.2), addressed to a Hungarian ‘coetus’ (not a ‘sodalitas’) was first published in 1492. Through a detailed analysis of the poem, I claim that this ode was not directed to an academic circle of friends in Buda, but rather to the ‘bursa Hungarorum’ at the University of Cracow. As Celtis took up teaching in Ingolstadt in the spring of 1492, he published the Epitoma, which contained his course material on rhetoric from Cracow, and contained five poems, including this poem, which he composed while still in Poland. Consequently, it cannot be regarded as a proof of the continuity of academic thought between the Neo-platonic circles of King Matthias (1485-1490) and the Vienna-centered Sodalitas Danubiana of 1497. Around 1500, to please his Hungarian aristocratic friends in the Sodalitas Danubiana, he revised the same poem in Vienna and added it to the cycle of his Odes.

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The author’s monograph published in Hungarian in 2001 was the first attempt to give an overview of the theme of King Matthias Corvinus in Slovenian folk tradition and literature. This study provides some further details on this subject, suggesting a new interpretation of traditional folk texts about King Matthias Corvinus as texts of collective memory, collective narrative and collective identity. The myth of King Matthias Corvinus as a saviour strongly condenses how this exceptional soldier and possible crusade leader, who vanquishes the unbelievers and heretics, liberated this part of Europe from barbarism and instilled in it the spirit of humanism and the Renaissance.

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Abstract

The article introduces a manuscript organically related to the 1416 visit of King Sigismund to England that has so far been unknown in Hungarian scholarship, moreover, its iconographic evidence, i.e. its ink drawings have not been sufficiently investigated in the international Sigismund-historiography. On surface level the textual references and the iconographic representation provide evidence for the Anglo-Hungarian, Anglo-German relations of the early fifteenth century. On the other hand, it also shed light to the Anglo-Continental relations of the 1480s–90s, the reign of King Richard III (1483–85). The so-calledWarwick-, or Rous Roll, a Middle English codex attributed to the household genealogist of the earls of Warwick, John Rous, also has a Latin variant – the Lancastrian Roll – held at the College of Arms (the college of the Garter King of Arms, collegium armorum) in London. The Pageant has been dated to varying dates between 1483 and 1492, though most scholars agree that the most probable date is between 1483 and 1485, the reign of Richard III. The Rous Rolls are dated a bit earlier, to the late 1470s or early 1480s. The British Library Catalogue puts the English roll between 1483 and 1485. The Latin manuscript might be even made earlier, between 1477 and 1485. All three narratives report on the close and even intimate relationship between the earl and King Sigismund of Luxemburg of Hungary, but from the point of view of Hungarian memoriae regum the first one, the Beauchamp Pageant is the most significant since it has precious iconographic evidence on the political activity, the court and the entourage of King Sigismund and Queen Barbara during the Council of Constance. Beyond giving an overview of the manuscript, this study aims to investigate how and from where the author and illuminator could have learnt of and gathered information on the Hungarian relations of the earl and on what grounds the artist portrayed King Sigismund.

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