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. Principles of Plant Breeding 1960 Anonymous (2004): Annual Progress Report . All India Co-ordinated Research Project on Oilseeds (Linseed

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biomass production and lignan content of linseed ( Linum usitatissimum L.). J. Sci. Food. Agric. , 86 , 415–419. Morales F. Effects of growing site and nitrogen

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Freer, J. B. S., Sansome, G. (1991): The influence of plant population and nitrogen fertility on the seed yield and quality of linseed. Aspects of Applied Biology: Production and Protection of Linseed , 28 , 49

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initial curing stage of epoxidized linseed oil typically follows a chemically controlled reaction mechanism. Imidazole initiates the curing reaction by opening the oxiran ring under formation of a zwitterion [ 19 ] (Scheme 1 , 1). The subsequent cross

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Abstract  

In this paper the polymerisation of linseed oil is studied in order to prove the catalytic action of some inorganic pigments. The results show that the calorimetric technique is able to monitor the polymerisation process in the temperature range between 130 and220C; reproducible values for isothermal analysis are obtained between 130 and 150C;finally the results are quantitative and can be justified by kinetic equations.

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Eiben, Cs., Tóbiás, G., Gódor, S., Végi, B., Virág, GY., Zsédely, E., Tóth, T. & Schmidt, J. (2006): A nyúltáp napraforgó- és lenolaj kiegészítésének hatása: 1. Növekedés és vágóérték. (Influence of sunflower and linseed oil supplementation of rabbit

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., Eisner, P., Yoshie-Stark, Y., Nakada, R. & Kirchhoff, E. (2010): Functional properties and chemical composition of fractionated brown and yellow linseed meal ( Linum usitatissimum L.). J. Fd Engng, 98 , 453

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Wheat flour was enhanced by linseed fibre, characterised by granulation 500–700 μm. Using seeds from 2015 flax harvest, linseed fibre was gained from two golden and one brown linseed varieties (Amon, Raciol and Recital, respectively). Additions at levels 2.5% and 5.0% affected amylases activity and protein technological quality softly, evaluated by Falling Number and Zeleny sedimentation tests, respectively. Both brown and yellow linseed fibre significantly supported extensograph elasticity of non-fermented dough. Baking potential of composites tested evaluated as extensograph energy significantly decreased about 7–18%, likely owing to dilution of dough gluten skeleton. Pasting behaviour of flour composites reflected a hydrophilic character of non-traditional material – amylograph viscosity was elevated from 590 units to ca 700 units by Amon and Recital fibre, and to ca 930 units by Raciol fibre. Pasting profiles of flour composites, recorded by using of Rapid Visco Analyser, confirmed this finding. Dough fermentation was represented by maturograph test, during which the tested samples were differentiated in part according to the dough resistance. Reflecting small modifications in dough visco-elastic properties, specific volumes of bread buns were similar trough whole sample set. A weak worsening of buns vaulting reflected a partial disruption of dough gluten skeleton. Consumer’s quality of all enhanced bread variants was evaluated in category acceptable, determined as crumb penetration (values higher than 20 mm).

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Summary Cold pressed linseed oil and paints prepared using the inorganic pigments; lead white and red lead, were characterized using non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in an air atmosphere to determine the effect of the pigment on the oxidative polymerisation of the drying oil medium. For each paint sample, the onset temperature for oxidation was reduced from 166°C to the range 50 to 60°C when a heating rate of 5 K min-1 was used. In order to determine the rate of drying, the non-isothermal experiments were carried out using a range of heating rates. A change in the mechanism oxidative polymerization was observed as the heating rate was increased.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: J. Tarek-Tilistyák, J. Agócs, M. Lukács, M. Dobró-Tóth, M. Juhász-Román, Z. Dinya, J. Jekő and E. Máthé

The nutritive value, the microbiological safety of oilseed cake (OSC) obtained from naked pumpkin seed (PuC), sunflower seed (SC), yellow linseed (LC), and walnut (WnC), and their impact on wheat flour (WF) dough and bread sensory characteristics at 5% and 10% addition ratio were investigated. The OSCs had high protein (34–50%), fat (8–15%), total dietary fibre (23–36%) content and high energy value (383–444 kcal/100 g)). The OSC samples with a minimal exception fulfilled the requirements of feed legislation in force. An increased water absorption, dough development time, and reduced elasticity were observed probably due to the enhanced fiber and protein content. Dough stability increased with WnC, and decreased with PuC or SC addition. Enrichment provided the appearance of a brown bread for WnC, of a half-brown bread for LC. PuC gave an unusual look. The appearance of OSC fortified bread similar to daily bread, was an advantage resulting the 1st rank for 10% WnC bread and the 2nd one for 10% LC bread (P=0.05). The studied OSCs are suitable for food enrichment, however, in case of PuC and SC fortified flour blends, hydrocolloid application is recommended. Our data suggest that the newly developed fortified breads could be a valuable source for healthy nutrition.

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