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The CANTUS database provides indices of chant manuscripts for the Office in both electronic and printed formats. The database was developed in the 1980s at the Catholic University of America under the leadership of Ruth Steiner. The goals and basic structure of the project remain true to the vision of its founder; however, since the move to Canada there have been some changes in format and presentation of the data. This progress report is the first official presentation of these alterations. Seventy-one liturgical books have been indexed. The centre of distribution is the project's website at http://publish.uwo.ca/~cantus/. The database consists of indices that indicate the actual contents of individual sources. The project has proven useful in a variety of fields including liturgical chant, early music, medieval liturgy, hagiography, and ecclesiastical history.

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The study describes three Church Slavic manuscript liturgical books (a Tetra Gospel from the last decade of the 16th century, a Triodion from the second quarter of the 16th century, a Ritual commemorating the transfer of St. Nicholas's relics from 1594 and an Octoechos from the turn of the 16th and 17th centuries.

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Manuscripts and printed editions of Hungarian provenance contain 288 sequences, out of which 237 have their own music. Particular dioceses and ecclesiastical institutions could decide freely which item they would sing on a given feast. The Ascension sequence Sursum sonet laudis melos, besides being present in the Futaki Gradual, is found only in three manuscripts of Zagreb provenance and in the missal of that diocese printed in 1511. The item is a shortened version in seven verses of a longer, eleven-verse original, written before 1305 by an unknown author and occurring very rarely in sources outside Hungary. In its present shortened form, it is only preserved in the liturgical books of the Hungarian use. The surviving sources show that this variant of the text is the result of a deliberate recrafting that occurred in Zagreb in the first part of the 14th century.

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but a whole set of splendid liturgical books for his cathedral. As such, Filipecz was just one of a long series of prelates on the bishop’s throne of Várad who were instrumental in the cultural flowering of the city under the influence of Italian

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