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The reform of the Council of Trent made great influence on the liturgical development of all Europe. That was also the fact in Hungary: in 1630 the local synod of Nagyszombat accepted the introduction of the Tridentine rite into the Hungarian Church. Nevertheless some of dioceses - existed more independently - protested against this decision and insisted on the continuation of their own medieval traditions. Among these dioceses Zagreb was the greatest “Protestant”. The cathedral itself guarded his medieval tradition till 1788. Through this largely documented processional practise of Zagreb Cathedral (ten manuscripts and one printed processional from the 14th up to the 18th centuries) one can follow the particularities of a liturgy preserved isolated: the basically remained liturgical chants were influenced by some new practise, mainly simplifications but additions as well.

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The spatial dimension of liturgy

Historical and contemporary accounts of communio-space in Europe’s Latin rite liturgical architecture

Építés - Építészettudomány
Author: Vilmos Katona

Catholic Liturgy . In: E. Fernández-Cobián (ed.): Arquitectura de lo sagrado . Memoria y proyecto . Netbiblo, Ourense 2009 . 178 – 205 . Debuyst 2005 Debuyst , F

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In 1397 a group of Carmelites left Prague in Bohemia and traveled to Krakow, Poland to establish a new foundation. The new convent later established its own scriptorium, which produced numerous codices, including liturgical choir books, manuscripts from the Polish Carmelite convent of Lwow were later added to the collection. The surviving codices now number twenty-five choir books from both the medieval and Tridentine eras. Table 1 gives an entire list of the Carmelite Codices of Krakow. Table 2 enumerates the feast celebrated in the medieval Krakow Carmelite liturgy. These codices offer valuable insights into Carmelite liturgical practices before and after the Council of Trent.

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The responsory — a genre originated in early period of Gregorian chant, but also increasing in number until the end of the Middle Ages — is expected as transmitted in a rather stable melodic shape. The paper lists and analyses, however, 27 items with more than one melody and with variants in a wide scope of modes. In addition, 15 tunes are listed that has been adapted as contrafacta (and not as a model-melody) to new texts. These latter include not only parts of saints’ offices but also items belonging to the temporale part of the office.

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Abstract

In this paper, the author analyzes the structure, word formation, and meaning of Church Slavonic lexical elements with semantics of worship and rites on the basis of secular written documents which served as a source for the Dictionary of the Ukrainian language in the 16th and the first half of the 17th centuries and for the Historical Dictionary of the Ukrainian language edited by Ye. Tymchenko. The use of Church Slavonic lexicalized phrases and idioms are also studied. The development of semantics of Church Slavonic words in present-day Ukrainian and in liturgical practice is considered as well.

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This study is intended to introduce a pioneering project called Missalia that should serve to enable the analysis and comparison of the Mass proper as a whole, including not only the chanted parts in the strict sense, but also the so-called euchological material, and the corpus of lessons. Given that they belong to the same system, their analysis is indispensable for the interpretation of musical sources, because the layer of the Gradual in its entirety is far less variable than that of the Sacramentary or the Lectionary. Some new principles and methods are proposed in order to describe and classify the Mass proper of medieval liturgical uses, pre-eminently the necessity of a Europe-wide sampling and the importance of early printed material. As a case study, a recent discovery is presented which demonstrates a close and exclusive link between the euchological layers of the late printed Missals of Regensburg and Zagreb. This relationship can be traced back to, and becomes even more obvious in the early 13th century, and a conclusion can be drawn that it originated in the first decades of the 11th century. In this period, and in this period only, is it feasible to suppose that Regensburg exerted a strong influence on the composition of the early Hungarian Sacramentary.

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After the death of Constantine the Philosopher, his brother Methodius, the Archbishop of Srem, proved the groundlessness of the teaching on triglossy and defended Slavic literacy and liturgy. The success of his activity caused malevolent reaction of some of the clergy of the Frankish Empire. Sources reveal that Methodius did not have any independent doctrine and, in his liturgical activity, followed the teaching and practice of the Roman Church. It turned out that, initiating the trial against Methodius, Bavarian clergy had not enough grounds for this. They fabricated accusations, opposing to Slavic books and the celebration of liturgy in native tongue.

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Only two of the five polyphonic settings of St Anne’s liturgy in the 16th-century Vesperale Anna Hannsen Schuman at the Slovenský Národný Archív in Bratislava are correctly texted. This paper shows how the rhymed responsory Iesu Christe nepos cuius tu could be identified and the texts of the rhymed antiphons O beata Christi ava and Annae sanctae celebremus complemented by consulting a plainchant source from Kirnberg an der Mank in lower Austria.

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The CANTUS database provides indices of chant manuscripts for the Office in both electronic and printed formats. The database was developed in the 1980s at the Catholic University of America under the leadership of Ruth Steiner. The goals and basic structure of the project remain true to the vision of its founder; however, since the move to Canada there have been some changes in format and presentation of the data. This progress report is the first official presentation of these alterations. Seventy-one liturgical books have been indexed. The centre of distribution is the project's website at http://publish.uwo.ca/~cantus/. The database consists of indices that indicate the actual contents of individual sources. The project has proven useful in a variety of fields including liturgical chant, early music, medieval liturgy, hagiography, and ecclesiastical history.

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The signature of a nun on the first page of Cape Town, South African Library, MS Grey 3c23 made it possible not only to determine the provenance of the manuscript, but also to locate two similar manuscripts in France and two in Yugoslavia. All of these manuscripts are antiphonaries for Lauds and Vespers written for nuns at the Charterhouse of Mont-Saint-Marie, at Gosnay near Arras in France. They are the only extant Carthusian antiphonaries for Lauds and Vespers and had been written for Mont-Saint-Marie because the nuns of that Charterhouse sang only those Offices. All are dated around 1540. The antiphonaries conform to the Carthusian liturgy. There is no great divergence between the music in the five manuscripts and in the Carthusian antiphonaries. Small differences exist, however. These are not the result of error, but prove that no general exemplar existed for the music of the Carthusian antiphonary.

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