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Cleminson et al. 2006 = Cleminson R., Moussakova E., Voutova N. Catalogue of the Slavonic Cyrillic Manuscripts of the National Széchényi Library . Budapest: CEU Press, National Széchényi Library, 2006

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Solkhat, the regional capital of the Golden Horde in the Crimean Peninsula, was a multi-cultural city, with two Jewish communities—Rabbanite and Karaite. Unlike other Jewish centres in the Golden Horde, Hebrew manuscripts from 13th–15th century Solkhat have survived. These documents enable a micro-historical glance into its Jewish life, mainly of the Karaite community. However, they provide only a partial picture of the origins of these Jewish communities, circumstances of Karaite immigration to Eastern Europe, and their use of the Qıpçaq language. Parallel social and cultural processes in Solkhat's non-Jewish communities offer directions for a possible solution to these issues.

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Abstract

This contribution presents the concept of 'seven heavens' as preserved by eight manuscripts of Muhammad ibn 'Abdallah al-Kisâ'ï's collections of Islamic religious tales Kitab A’ğāi’b al-MalakUt and Qisas al-Anbiyā It focuses on and compares the contents and composition of the chapter devoted to the topic and analyses the variations in the mss., which shed light on the way the tales are transmitted. Some of them represent variability in the original information, whereas others (including significant semantic shifts) may easily have emerged as a result of even minor scribal lapses.

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Budapest, Országos Széchényi Library, Codex latinus medii aevi 137 is a parchment codex from the 15th century that contains the poems of Catullus and Tibullus. It has a twin in Cologny, Bibliotheca Bodmeriana, MS. Bodmer 141, which contains the poems of Propertius; the two manuscripts were copied together and once constituted a two-volume ‘edition’ of the three poets. The subscription of the volume in Cologny shows that both were copied in 1466 in Florence by Ioannes Petrus de Spoleto. They were soon acquired by Antonello Petrucci (?-1487), secretary to King Ferdinand of Naples, and after Petrucci’s execution they entered the royal library. It is not clear what happened to the second volume when the library was scattered around AD 1500, but the first volume appears to have remained in Italy: in the early 16th century it was owned by one Iuuarius Indicus or Indico or Íñigo de Guevara, who presented it to his tutor Placidius Jacobus Antonius Ubertus in 1529, as is shown by an owner’s note and an epigram by Jacobus Antonius on the front flyleaf of the codex. Then we lose track of the first volume as well.The origins of the text of Propertius in the second volume have already been studied by Butrica, who noted that the codex was a sibling of the Codex Memmianus (Parisinus lat. 8233) and of Urbinas lat. 641. The stemma of Tibullus is not known well enough for us to be able to locate the first volume within it. However, it can be demonstrated that the text of Catullus in this volume descends indirectly from Siena H.V.41, and ultimately from R (Vatican, Ottobonianus lat. 1829); and that for Catullus too the volume is a sibling of the Memmianus and of Urbinas lat. 641.

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Introduction Manuscripts with “Part 1,” “Part I,”…, “Part N ” in the title that are intended to be published as a series are called multiple-part manuscripts . Some journals require that all parts of a multiple

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Abstract

The legend of St. Sisynnios has been widespread in both Christian and popular Ethiopian tradition up to the present time. It exists in the form of written texts in the Ge’ez language, inserted in so-called magic scrolls among other closely connected texts of both magical and religious character. These scrolls have a protective function, and St. Sisynnios is venerated by the Ethiopian Church. There are two versions of his life. The shorter one comprises part of the Synaxarion whilethe longer one is included in a corpus of hagiographical compilations entitled “The Lives of the Martyrs”. Both of these were translated from the Arabic prototype, borrowed from the mother Coptic Church of Alexandria. There is a notable interconnection between the legend in the amulets and the religious texts. It is unknown whether the text of the legend once existed in form of verbal charm or not. In any case, different elements of the saint’s life passed to the legend. Some have remained unchanged while others have undergone transformations or lost some elements. It is important to study different elements of the legend using the examples conserved in the available manuscript scrolls. Analysis of these interconnections and the evolution of the text constitutes the basis of the present research.

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Fényes 1851 = Fényes Elek: Magyarország geographiai szótára I. Pest, 1851. Kocsis 1999–2001 = The Szeged Minea. A Cyrillic Manuscript from the Late 16th Century . A text edition by Mihály Kocsis

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* The research was financially supported by RGNF (Russian Humanitarian Scientific Fund), project № 13-34-01214 “Russian manuscript dictionaries as a lexicographical genre of Muscovy: traditions and

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The signature of a nun on the first page of Cape Town, South African Library, MS Grey 3c23 made it possible not only to determine the provenance of the manuscript, but also to locate two similar manuscripts in France and two in Yugoslavia. All of these manuscripts are antiphonaries for Lauds and Vespers written for nuns at the Charterhouse of Mont-Saint-Marie, at Gosnay near Arras in France. They are the only extant Carthusian antiphonaries for Lauds and Vespers and had been written for Mont-Saint-Marie because the nuns of that Charterhouse sang only those Offices. All are dated around 1540. The antiphonaries conform to the Carthusian liturgy. There is no great divergence between the music in the five manuscripts and in the Carthusian antiphonaries. Small differences exist, however. These are not the result of error, but prove that no general exemplar existed for the music of the Carthusian antiphonary.

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Periodization of Naxi Dongba script] . Beijing : Renmin Chubanshe . Deng Zhangying 鄧章應 , Zheng Changli 鄭長麗 2013 . Naxi Dongbajing bayu ji bayuyongzi yanjiu 納西東巴經跋語及跋語用字研究 [A Study of Naxi Dongba Manuscript Postscripts and their Use of Scripts

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