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, Liz , London and New York , 1997 . Wilk (ed.) 2006 Modernism Designing a New World 1914–1939 , ed. Wilk , Christopher , London : V&A Publications , 2006

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It is a highly peculiar phenomenon in Hungarian — and perhaps in East and Central European — literature of the early 20th century that Avant-Garde tendencies started to gain some (weak) position parallel with the first wave of Modernism, and when they received — understandably — a rather hostile reaction on the part of Conservative (nationalistic, traditional, anti-Western) literary circles, their reception on the part of the evolving Modernist literature was not much more friendly either. Strangely enough, besides some signals of solidarity and sympathy, the criticisms of Modernism turned against Avant-Garde were in harmony with those formulated by the Conservative circles. However, as the Latin saying goes, “duo cum faciunt idem, non est idem” (that is, when two do the same thing, it is not the same thing) — despite the apparent interference of Modernist and Conservative criticisms aimed against Avant-Garde tendencies, the position of the actors in question was radically different. In what follows, I give a short account of the Avant-Gardists’ debate with their Modernist contemporaries and an even shorter account of their debate with their Conservative adversaries.

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A 19. század építészete a szlovák szakmai irodalom kevésbé feldolgozott témái közé tartozik. Behatóbb megismerése több módon lehetséges. Megközelíthető az alkotók életútjain keresztül, vagy a nem egyszer kimagasló minőségű alkotások történetének feltárása által, melyeket a mai Szlovákiának mint a Habsburg Monarchiának, illetve Ausztria-Magyarországnak a kontextusában, valamint Közép-Európa geopolitikai, kulturális és társadalmi összefüggéseiben kell szemügyre vennünk. A 19. század építészetének így értelmezett háttere kihangsúlyozza annak egyedi vonásait, stílus- és típusbeli sokrétűségét, a technológiai haladást és modern elemeit, ugyanakkor rögzíti a helyi építészeti hagyomány és a külső befolyások kapcsolatát, tehát az európai építészet visszatükröződését. E sokszínűséget a klaszszicizmustól a modern hajnaláig jelentőségükkel a régió határait túllépő személyiségek képviselik, kezdve a sort Hefele Menyhérttel és lezárva azt Dušan S. Jurkovičcsal vagy Harminc M. Mihállyal.

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arts. 1 According to Borstlap, Ligeti insists that the avant-garde must be transcended, and petrified modernism “overcome,” as a dead-end. Ligeti's example proved the danger of a historical, linear perspective to new composition, rather than one

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Abstract  

In view of recent studies on the avant-garde, the modern and the postmodern, the essay deals with the chance of visualizing a unified epochal stream of modernism as part of the humanistic tradition, contrasted with examples of its “formulaic” postmodernist criticism.

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Niculescu's music, alongside peasant folklore, George Enescu and European models of modernism: Béla Bartók, Igor Stravinsky, Paul Hindemith, Olivier Messiaen, Anton Webern. His diverse techniques for incorporating the sacred into modern composition range

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Abstract

The terminology of trends in modernism has become irrelevant in the contemporary world, either totally or in part. They are frequently used in tribute to tradition (viz. cubic futurism). In Lithuania, the situation is different. The notion of expressionistic painting is all-encompassing. It enjoys primacy, respect, and attention stemming from national twentieth century modernist painting. Expressionism could also be, for instance, labeled fauvism [see illustration]. In painting, as well as other arts, more rational and intellectual trends have frequently come to be designated “alien” or “of little artistic merit”. One of the methods of countering stereotypes would consist of redefinition, an expansion of precision in old concepts and introduction of new ones.

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embodied in musical forms. This is the basis for the homology between the sense of reverent awe experienced before natural beauty and that occasioned by music ... . 1 Both modernity and its twentieth-century chapter, modernism, however, are characterized by

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benefitted from a certain degree of modernism and economic progress, but also retained a more archaic middle-class based social structure. A good example of the unique identity that developed in Kassa, and the local patriotism that existed there, is revealed

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