Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 288 items for :

  • "moisture content" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

the elements. There may also be a risk of fungal decay in wood elements at temperatures above 23 °C and Relative Humidity (RH) above 42%. That explains the importance of taking the Moisture Content (MC) in consideration when wooden structures are

Open access

The objective of the work reported here was to determine changes in the moisture content, firmness characteristics, color attributes and NIR absorbance of two carrot cultivars during storage. There was a definite loss in the moisture content that caused changes in the firmness. This result shows that carrot firmness is very sensitive to the moisture content. The firmness — especially the cutting force — is a good characteristic for predicting changes in carrot moisture content during storage. The color characteristics — a* and b* — showed a slight change in the function of the moisture content. However, these color characteristics are suitable for distinguishing the phloem and xylem parts of carrot cultivars. There were not found definite changes in the NIR absorbance as the function of the moisture content. Consequently, the specific cutting force and the impact stiffness coefficient are good characteristics of the carrot moisture content and the mass reduction during storage under non-ideal conditions.

Restricted access

Generally the drying process of fruits is followed by weight loss. The weight loss characterizes only the global moisture content of fruits and does not give information about the inner state of tissue. Electrical impedance spectroscopy of biological tissues shows ab-dispersion band that is associated with membrane structures and is sensitive to their integrity and functionality. The aim of this study was to measure the impedance spectra of apple slices during drying and to correlate impedance parameters to moisture content in the different drying periods. The electrical impedance spectra of apple slices were determined during drying by an HP 4284A Precision LCR Meter in frequency range from 30 Hz up to 1 MHz. The measured spectra were approximated by Cole-impedance elements. Parameter values for the fitted curves that characterized the state of drying tissue showed good correlation with the moisture content calculated from weight loss in the two falling-rate drying periods.

Restricted access

Seed moisture content is a well-recognised index of safe storage. However, when in equilibrium with the storage environment it is merely an indicator of the relative humidity of the air, which is the primary regulator of the growth of moulds and insects. The relationship is influenced by the profile of the seed components. During the 1990s, significant increases in the seed oil content of evening primrose were achieved through plant breeding. This paper shows that the equilibrium moisture content of evening primrose seeds declines significantly with increasing oil content. Hence, the moisture isotherm is altered and newer cultivars must be stored at slightly lower seed moisture contents to ensure that seed and oil quality are maintained.

Restricted access

82 58 67 Romano, G., Baranyai, L., Gottschalk, K. & Zude, M. (2008): An approach for monitoring the moisture content changes of drying

Restricted access

-John Corporation. Gillay, B., Funk, D. B. (2006) Effects of moisture distribution on measurement of moisture content of dried corn. Acta Alimentaria (forthcoming). Effects of moisture distribution

Restricted access

References Altuntas , E. , Yildiz , M. ( 2007 ) Effect of moisture content on some physical and mechanical properties of faba bean (Vicia faba L.) grains . Journal of

Restricted access

The effect of varying weather conditions on the moisture content of the maize grain yield was investigated in Martonvásár, Hungary from late August to late September, and from the 3rd third of September to the 1st third of Novemberbetween 1999 and 2002. In every year a close positive correlation (P=0.1%) could be observed between the moisture content in late September and the rate of drying down in October. Linear regression was used each year to determine the equilibrium moisture content, to which the moisture content of kernels returned if they contained less than this quantity of water in late September and harvesting was delayed. In the experimental years this value ranged from 15.24-19.01%.

Restricted access

Drying yellow-dent field corn from harvest moisture levels to safe storage levels is a major cost for producers. This cost can be minimized by precise control of the final moisture content through feed-forward or feedback control. One of the difficulties in achieving control of corn drying is the inaccuracy of dielectric moisture measurements due to non-uniform moisture distributions within kernels after drying. After dried grain has equilibrated for several hours, moisture measurements are somewhat different than immediately after drying. This research examined these effects for yellow-dent field corn over a range of measurement frequencies and drying conditions. Prediction equations relating dielectric constant to moisture content were developed for a range of radio frequencies. The differences between predicted moisture values for recently dried and equilibrated corn were found to be dependent on the measurement frequency and the final moisture content of the grain. For some conditions, particularly for low measurement frequencies and high final moisture contents, predicted moisture contents increased after equilibration. However, predicted moisture values decreased upon equilibration if the final moisture content was near 15 percent, especially if the measurement frequency was between 500 kHz and 10 MHz. Higher measurement frequencies generally yielded smaller predicted moisture differences than lower frequencies.

Restricted access

Various forms of physical soil degradation, including soil compaction, have been widely investigated both in Hungary and abroad. Soil compaction is a world-scale problem, which may be triggered by both natural and artificial factors and may adversely influence the effectiveness of crop production. In the long run this unfavourable change in the physical condition of the soil may result in extra expenses, higher energy consumption and excessive environmental damage. The effect of conventional tillage on the physical condition of the soil was assessed on six farms for three years in the framework of field experiments. In this study the physical condition of the soil was examined in terms of soil penetration resistance and moisture content. Significant differences between the experiments were revealed when penetration resistance (PR) was examinated at a depth of 20–30 cm, but not at other depths. In 2004 the mean PR values exceeded 3 MPa in experiments A, B and E. In 2005 significant differences were observed between the experiments at a depth of 30–40 cm, but no adverse compaction was detected at any depth in any of the experiments. In 2006 significant differences were observed between the experiments at depths of 0–10 cm and 10–20 cm, though even in that year no adverse soil compaction was detected. In the first year significant differences in soil moisture content were revealed at depths of 10–20 cm, 20–30 cm, 30–40 cm and 40–50 cm, and in 2005 at depths of 20–30 cm and 30–40 cm. In 2006 no significant differences were found between the experiments at any depth. The highest soil moisture contents were recorded in all the experiments at a depth of 30–40 cm. All in all, the results of both penetration resistance and moisture content were indicative of favourable soil conditions. During the period investigated adversely compact layers that would hamper moisture transport were not found in any of the experiments.

Restricted access