Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 25 items for :

  • "moral panic" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Espen Aarseth
,
Anthony M. Bean
,
Huub Boonen
,
Michelle Colder Carras
,
Mark Coulson
,
Dimitri Das
,
Jory Deleuze
,
Elza Dunkels
,
Johan Edman
,
Christopher J. Ferguson
,
Maria C. Haagsma
,
Karin Helmersson Bergmark
,
Zaheer Hussain
,
Jeroen Jansz
,
Daniel Kardefelt-Winther
,
Lawrence Kutner
,
Patrick Markey
,
Rune Kristian Lundedal Nielsen
,
Nicole Prause
,
Andrew Przybylski
,
Thorsten Quandt
,
Adriano Schimmenti
,
Vladan Starcevic
,
Gabrielle Stutman
,
Jan Van Looy
, and
Antonius J. Van Rooij

, and rights-based fallout that should also be considered. 1. Moral panics around the harm of video gaming might result in premature application of a clinical diagnosis and the treatment of abundant

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Antonius J. van Rooij
,
Christopher J. Ferguson
,
Michelle Colder Carras
,
Daniel Kardefelt-Winther
,
Jing Shi
,
Espen Aarseth
,
Anthony M. Bean
,
Karin Helmersson Bergmark
,
Anne Brus
,
Mark Coulson
,
Jory Deleuze
,
Pravin Dullur
,
Elza Dunkels
,
Johan Edman
,
Malte Elson
,
Peter J. Etchells
,
Anne Fiskaali
,
Isabela Granic
,
Jeroen Jansz
,
Faltin Karlsen
,
Linda K. Kaye
,
Bonnie Kirsh
,
Andreas Lieberoth
,
Patrick Markey
,
Kathryn L. Mills
,
Rune Kristian Lundedal Nielsen
,
Amy Orben
,
Arne Poulsen
,
Nicole Prause
,
Patrick Prax
,
Thorsten Quandt
,
Adriano Schimmenti
,
Vladan Starcevic
,
Gabrielle Stutman
,
Nigel E. Turner
,
Jan van Looy
, and
Andrew K. Przybylski

used and consulted in policy settings, school systems, and healthcare. They are used by individuals who might not be knowledgeable about the nuances of media use, moral panic, and normative game-related behavior (including parents of children

Open access

Functional impairment matters in the screening and diagnosis of gaming disorder

Commentary on: Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal (Aarseth et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Joël Billieux
,
Daniel L. King
,
Susumu Higuchi
,
Sophia Achab
,
Henrietta Bowden-Jones
,
Wei Hao
,
Jiang Long
,
Hae Kook Lee
,
Marc N. Potenza
,
John B. Saunders
, and
Vladimir Poznyak

the arguments developed by Aarseth et al.; namely, that the ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal would result in “moral panics around the harm of video gaming” and “the treatment of abundant false-positive cases.” This commentary does not address the

Open access

Artificial concerns. Effects of a commercial advertisement on modern health worries and sympathetic activation

Mesterséges aggodalmak. Egy hirdetés modernkori egészségféltésre és szimpatikus aktivációra gyakorolt hatása

Mentálhigiéné és Pszichoszomatika
Authors:
Ferenc Köteles
,
Eszter Tarján
, and
Tímea Berkes

Theoretical background

Many companies offer products that are claimed to protect against harmful environmental factors. Advertisements of such products are designed to maximize risk perception and worrying, which may have a negative impact on psychological functioning and health. Public worry about the harmful effects of various environmental factors may also be boosted.

Aim

To measure the impact of an advertising film on worrying and sympathetic activation.

Methods

100 young adults completed questionnaires measuring constructs that were connected to modern health worries in past studies (somatosensory amplification, health anxiety, subjective somatic symptoms, beliefs about the validity of complementary and alternative medicine, holistic health beliefs, and spirituality). Participants were asked to watch an advertising film exaggerating the risks posed by electromagnetic radiation or a control film. Sympathetic activation (as assessed by heart rate) was measured before and after the intervention. Worrying (as assessed by the Radiation sub-scale of the Modern Health Worries Scale) was measured before and after the intervention, and three weeks later.

Results

Compared to the control film, the advertisement caused an acute increase in heart rate (t(98) = 4.122, p < .001). Concerning worrying, a mixed analysis of variance indicated a significant group × time interaction (F(2,98) = 3.455; p = .034). In the post hoc analysis, the control group showed no significant deviations from baseline. In the intervention group, however, significant (p < .05) differences were found from baseline at both follow-ups. Acute change in worrying was not connected to any assessed psychological construct (i.e., no effect modification was found).

Conclusions

Commercial advertisements of certain health protecting products can play a role in the generation and maintenance of modern health worries. From a broader point of view, such advertisements may contribute to both the social amplification of risk and possible development of a moral panic.

Restricted access

identify individuals with problematic gaming that requires further intervention. Therefore, we classified these concerns into three categories: conceptual framework, moral panic, and diagnostic validity (see Tables 1 – 3 ) Conceptual framework of GD Table

Open access

excessive gaming. This responsibility needs to be shared by popular media who are often quick to build a moral panic around gaming behaviors, often based on cherry-picking specific case studies and pieces of research which support their headlines. In sum

Open access

crime. He also showed that this effect prevails partly through the media. 3.4.1 Moral panic The role of the media and the internet is often framed with the concept of moral panic. Stanley

Open access

Balancing between prejudice and fact for Gaming Disorder: Does the existence of alcohol use disorder stigmatize healthy drinkers or impede scientific research?

Commentary on “Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal”

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Seung-Yup Lee
,
Hyekyung Choo
, and
Hae Kook Lee

. Finally, we will discuss issues regarding “moral panic,” “stigma,” or “rights of children” ( Aarseth et al., 2016 ). Our experience in Korea, where Internet gaming problems are especially prevalent, will be shared. The harmful

Open access

Stepping back to advance: Why IGD needs an intensified debate instead of a consensus

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Author:
Thorsten Quandt

diagnosis on the basis of chaos and confusion, as Kuss et al. ( 2017 ) describe it, is certainly not a good idea. The moral panic surrounding games – a situation that urges researchers to come to quick conclusions – has been discussed elsewhere ( Bowman

Open access

Both sides of the story: Addiction is not a pastime activity

Commentary on: Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal (Aarseth et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Kai W. Müller
and
Klaus Wölfling

comorbid disorders is automatically a better explanation for the health condition under examination. However, it stresses the fact that we have to apply sound diagnostic measures, when assessing IGD in a clinical context. Moral Panic and

Open access