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The author summarises his intellectual and personal journey from rationality and morality to spirituality. As internationally renowned expert in operation research and multi-objective optimisation, he developed a strong interest in organisational ethics, social and ethical accounting, values-based leadership and corporate social responsibility. Influenced by Eastern (especially Indian) spirituality he went further to explore the well-spring of rationality, morality and spirituality. In this way he broadened the perspective of business ethics by the conception of spiritual-based leadership, which addresses existential questions such as “Who am I?” “What is a good life for me and for others?” and “How best can I serve?” in organisational and everyday contexts.

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This paper analyzes the moral purpose that guides and determines the two works by Agathias, the epigrams and the Histories. We study his statements in this respect, and then, a literary resource that appears in his poetry and in his historical work: the presence of characters and anecdotes with cynical undertones, the effect of which is that his works may often be considered satirical. Finally, the very likely relationship between his ideas of the value of history and many of his satirical portraits and those of Lucian is studied as well.

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Abstract  

The expulsion of the notion of literary value from literary theory in late modernity belies the connection between morality and art, morality and beauty, morality and aesthetic judgement that has been formative and transformative of aesthetic theory in the wake of reflexive modernity. In this paper, I would like to trace the formations and transformations wrought in the relations between notions of taste, morality, and aesthetic judgement. And I will attempt to show how literary value is integrally bound up with aesthetic judgement and critique, not only at the inception of the practice of literary criticism in the eighteenth century, but at the point of its expulsion in the mid-twentieth century. The expulsion of literary and artistic value, I will argue, coincides with the inclusion of the negation of art in the definition of the modernist work of art itself, which thereby becomes assimilated to philosophical inquiry.

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There is considerable moral ambivalence in the representation of revenge in anglophone ballads (compared, perhaps, with folktales). A ballad like 'Lamkin' internalises the notion of personal injury as crime. In contrast, the poaching ballad 'The Death of Poor Bill Brown' depicts revenge without legal consequences, giving a sense of moral clarity which is nonetheless deceptive when set against its social background. 'The Gallant Poacher', on the other hand, employs a kind of popular theology to replace the impulse to revenge. Ballads like these do not teach morality, but rather invite the exploration and negotiation of ethical ideas like revenge and justice.

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This article is a continuation of a study published in AOH 66/1 (2013), pp. 25–45 entitled “What makes a good poet according to Someśvaradeva? Poetic merit, demerit and the ethics of poetry in the Surathotsava and the Kīrtikaumudī”. It provides the texts and the first English translations of several verses concerning ethics (Surathotsava 1.1–1.64 and Kīrtikaumudī 1.1–1.47) by the 13th-century poet Someśvaradeva, which had formed the basis of the analysis in that study. The edited texts here improve upon the older published versions, and, in the case of the Surathotsava, utilise textual variants and glosses to difficult puns not given in the printed text, by additionally taking into account two manuscripts.

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“Red Apple” is an Armenian marriage tradition. In Armenia newlywed couples used to make love for the first time on the night after the wedding. The woman is expected to have her first sexual experience at that time only. Following the First Night, proof of the bride’s virginity was given in the form of a blood spot on the bed-sheet.If the bride is a virgin, the main ceremony of the “Red Apple” is performed. Several married women — relatives of the man — prepare a tray of red apples and take it to the home of the bride’s parents. This visit is to show appreciation and praise for the bride’s parents.If the bride is not a virgin, she is judged strictly. She might be publicly shamed and divorced.Up to now this tradition has been generally observed. However, contemporary social changes are influencing the “Red Apple” tradition as well. Various transformations can be seen both in the tradition’s interpretation and in the way it is observed.This article is based on field research. It consists of two parts. In the first part the contemporary interpretations of the requirement of a woman’s virginity are presented. In the second part an attempt is made to outline the main levels of the observance and transformation of the tradition.

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A jog és a társadalom viszonyában a társadalom a meghatározó tényező, a maga történelmileg kialakult sajátosságaival, gazdasági, politikai és kult__

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, Trans.). Free Press, New York. Judis, J. B.–Teixeira, R. A. (2002): The Emerging Democratic Majority . Scribner, New York. Lakoff, G. (1995): Metaphor, Morality, and Politics, or, Why Conservatives

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that is oriented to the secular plane, assessing the morality of someone’s actions, the story as part of the picture of elements of traditional culture, etc.), but also through paralinguistic elements (a storyteller’s way of experiencing narrative

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