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multidisciplinary care, investigators reasoned that those who had chance for adequate education for CKD had more information than those who obtained only nephrological care by single nephrologists. Poor understanding of the advantages and risks of renal

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For this volume of Hungarian Studies dedicated to multidisciplinary contributions of Hungarians around the world, I have chosen to describe my work on a unique multidisciplinary effort called TalkBank. This effort seeks to harness the new information technology to study the great complexities of human talk.

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: László Mangel, Erika Kövér, István Szilágyi, Zsuzsanna Varga, Éva Bércesi, Zsuzsanna Nagy, Tibor Holcz, Oszkár Karádi, Róbert Farkas, Szilvia Csák, Tibor Csere, and Miklós Kásler

Organization of multidisciplinary oncology patient care teams. [A multidiszciplináris onkológiai teamek működési rendje.]. Magy. Onkol., 2008, 52 , 319. [Hungarian] Organization of

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Bradford's law, perhaps the most well known of the Informetric regularities, analyzes the scattering of articles in a single discipline over journals. Yet journals are multi-disciplinary entities. This paper discusses the implications for Bradford's law of the multi-disciplinary character of journals, and defines a simple model that indicates the evolution of journals as a competition among subjects for space.

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Expanding on the multidisciplinary stakeholder framework to minimize harms for problematic risk-taking involving emerging technologies. •

Commentary on: Problematic risk-taking involving emerging technologies: A stakeholder framework to minimize harms (Swanton et al., 2019)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Jing Shi, Mark van der Maas, Nigel E. Turner, and Marc N. Potenza

Introduction Swanton, Blaszczynski, Forlini, Starcevic, and Gainsbury (2019a) proposed a multidisciplinary framework that describes stakeholders' responsibilities in minimizing harms from problematic risk-taking behaviors involving emerging

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Zoltán Mátrai, Gabriella Liszkay, Vanda Plotár, Zsolt Orosz, Judit Székely, Erika Hitre, Alexandra Bartal, Zoltán Langmár, Katalin Bőcs, Ferenc Rényi Vámos, Ákos Sávolt, and László Tóth

345 DuBay, D., Cimmino, V., Lowe, L. és mtsai: Low recurrence rate after surgery for dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. A multidisciplinary approach from a single institution

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Collaboration between researchers and between research organizations is generally considered a desirable course of action, in particular by some funding bodies. However, collaboration within a multidisciplinary community, such as the Computer–Human Interaction (CHI) community, can be challenging. We performed a bibliometric analysis of the CHI conference proceedings to determine if papers that have authors from different organization or countries receive more citations than papers that are authored by members of the same organization. There was no significant difference between these three groups, indicating that there is no advantage for collaboration in terms of citation frequency. Furthermore, we tested if papers written by authors from different organizations or countries receive more best paper awards or at least award nominations. Papers from only one organization received significantly fewer nominations than collaborative papers.

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The Centre for Nuclear Sciences was established in 1984 with the mandate to introduce Caribbean scientists to the application of nuclear technology in multi-disciplinary studies, and to carry out research in areas of national and regional importance. This paper describes the pesent facilities and the major programmes being carried out at the Centre.

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In the past forty years, the study of development has been transformed. At many universities, multidisciplinary centres for the study of development have been established. To be sure, most university postgraduate teaching departments, including economics, remain firmly focused on the single disciplinary approach. Despite this, however, it is now widely acknowledged that the study of “development” demands a multidisciplinary approach. Although many courses in “economic development”, “political development” and “social development” continue to be taught in single discipline departments, an understanding of the multidimensional process of “development” is seen to require an integrated mix of inputs from a wide range of disciplines. This explains in part the logic behind the establishment of centres of “development studies” where teachers, students, and researchers come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds including some from the hard sciences. Today, most multidisciplinary courses in development studies, most international development organisations, and most donor agencies now include not just a broadly similar set of topics on their agendas, but also use a broadly similar language and broadly similar interpretation of many of the concepts that they use. It is instructive to explore the process by which such a convergence of views evolved.

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A Multidisciplinary Research Programme (MRP) is being developed since 1989 in the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Spain, to support cross-disciplinary research projects. This paper analyses the incidence of interdisciplinarity in the UCM scientific publications over the period 1990–96 and tries to determine the success of the Programme at fostering cross-disciplinary research. Interdisciplinary in the UCM is measured through the collaboration of authors from different institutional addresses within the UCM, both in scientific publications and in research projects. Publications jointly signed by the different teams that collaborate in the projects were identified as an indicator of the success of the Programme in integrating disciplines. Interdisciplinary collaboration within the UCM showed an upward trend over time. Publications of MRP groups showed a higher interdisciplinary collaboration rate than the rest of the UCM (17% vs. 9%). Dramatic repercussions of the Programme were not expected due to its limited magnitude, but it worked as a catalyst, enhancing interdisciplinary relations within the UCM. The interest of such a programme is supported by its effects, both direct effects on granted teams and indirect on the whole UCM community.

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