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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Tamás Szendrei, Tamás Magyarlaki, Gábor Kovács, Ágnes Nagy, Árpád Szomor, Lenke Molnár, Mariann Dávid, Margit Tőkés-Füzesi, Orsolya Rideg, László Pótó, László Pajor, Béla Kajtár and Hajna Losonczy

Litmann, T., Druley, T. E., Stein, W. D. és mtsai: From MDR to MXR: new understanding of multidrug resistance systems, their properties and clinical significance (Review). CMLS, 2001, 58 , 931–959. Stein W

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Filipits, M.: Mechanisms of cancer: Multidrug resistance. Drug Discovery Today: Disease Mechanisms/Cancer, 2004, 2 , 229–234. Filipits M. Mechanisms of cancer: Multidrug resistance

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be considered as one of the consequences to widespread FQ consumption together with multidrug resistance (MDR), it has arisen at an alarming rate among P. aeruginosa [ 4 ]. The major FQ resistance mechanisms found in non-susceptible clinical

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Bergman, P. J. (1999): Multidrug resistance. In: Bonagura, J. D. and Kersey, R. (eds) Kirk’s Current Veterinary Therapy XIII. Small Animal Practice. 13th edition. W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia

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Pajak, B., Molnár, J., Engi, H. et al.: Preliminary studies on Phenothiazine-mediated reversal of multidrug resistance in mouse lymphoma and COLO 320 cells. In Vivo, 2005, 19 , 1101

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Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) bacteria frequently cause watery diarrhoea in newborn and weaned pigs. Plasmids carrying genes of different enterotoxins and fimbrial adhesins, as well as plasmids conferring antimicrobial resistance are of prime importance in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ETEC. Recent studies have revealed the significance of the porcine ETEC plasmid pTC, carrying tetracycline resistance gene tet(B) with enterotoxin genes. In contrast, the role of tet(A) plasmids in transferring resistance of porcine ETEC is less understood. The objective of the present study was to provide a comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles of porcine post-weaning ETEC strains representing pork-producing areas in Central Europe and in the USA, with special attention to plasmids carrying the tet(A) gene. Antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes of 87 porcine ETEC strains isolated from cases of post-weaning diarrhoea in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary and the Midwest USA was determined by disk diffusion and by PCR. Central European strains carrying tet(A) or tet(B) were further subjected to molecular characterisation of their tet plasmids. Results indicated that > 90% of the ETEC strains shared a common multidrug resistant (MDR) pattern of sulphamethoxazole (91%), tetracycline (84%) and streptomycin (80%) resistance. Tetracycline resistance was most frequently determined by the tet(B) gene (38%), while tet(A) was identified in 26% of all isolates with wide ranges for both tet gene types between some countries and with class 1 integrons and resistance genes co-transferred by conjugation. The virulence gene profiles included enterotoxin genes (lt, sta and/or stb), as well as adhesin genes (k88/f4, f18). Characterisation of two representative tet(A) plasmids of porcine F18+ ETEC from Central Europe revealed that the IncF plasmid (pES11732) of the Czech strain (~120 kb) carried tet(A) in association with catA1 for chloramphenicol resistance. The IncI1 plasmid (pES2172) of the Hungarian strain (~138 kb) carried tet(A) gene and a class 1 integron with an unusual variable region of 2,735 bp composed by two gene cassettes: estX-aadA1 encoding for streptothricin-spectinomycin/streptomycin resistance exemplifying simultaneous recruitment, assembly and transfer of multidrug resistance genes by the tet(A) plasmid of porcine ETEC. By this we provide the first description of IncF and IncI1 type plasmids of F18+ porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli responsible for cotransfer of the tet(A) gene with multidrug resistance. Additionally, the unusual determinant estX, encoding for streptothricin resistance, is first reported here in porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli.

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Balázs Nemes, Fanni Gelley, Eszter Dabasi, György Gámán, Imre Fehérvári, Dénes Görög, László Kóbori, János Fazakas, Eszter Vitális, Attila Doros, Zsuzsanna Gálffy and Zoltán Máthé

liver transplantation. Transplant. Proc., 2007, 39 (9), 2816–2821. 10 Morata, L., Cobos-Trigueros, N., Martínez, J. A., et al.: Influence of multidrug resistance

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–192. 14 Spengler, G., Takács, D., Horváth, A., et al.: Multidrug resistance reversing activity of newly developed phenothiazines on P-glycoprotein (ABCB1)-related resistance of mouse T

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Acinetobacter baumannii is a ubiquitous pathogen that has emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated infections at Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital. Isolates were assayed according to standard protocol. The isolates were subjected to molecular techniques to detect blaOXA, blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes in strains of the A. baumannii isolates.

The prevalence of A. baumannii was 8.5% and was most prevalent among patients in the age group 51–60 (36%); the male patients (63.6%) were more infected than their female counterparts. Patients (72.7%) in the intensive care unit (ICU) were most infected with this organism. The isolates showed 100% resistance to both amikacin and ciprofloxacin and 90.9% to both ceftriaxone and ceftazidime, while resistance to the other antibiotics used in this study were: piperacillin (81.8%), imipenem (72.7%), gentamycin (72.2%), and meropenem (63.6%). None of the isolates was, however, resistant to colistin. PCR results showed that blaOXA, blaTEM, and blaCTX-M genes were positive in some isolates, while blaSHV was not detected in any of the isolates.

This study has revealed that the strains of A. baumannii isolated are multiple drug resistant. Regular monitoring, judicious prescription, and early detection of resistance to these antibiotics are, therefore, necessary to check further dissemination of the organism.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Zsuzsanna Varga, Boglárka Sellyei, Petra Paulus, Melitta Papp, Kálmán Molnár and Csaba Székely

The objective of this study was to survey the incidence of Flavobacterium columnare in wild and cultured freshwater fish species in Hungary. This bacterium usually causes disease in waters of more than 25 °C temperature. However, with the introduction of intensive fish farming systems, infected fish exposed to stress develop disease signs also at lower temperatures; in addition, the temperature of natural waters rises to the critical level due to global warming. Twenty-five isolates from wild and cultured freshwater fishes were identified as F. columnare by specific PCR, although both the fragment lengths and the results of PCRRFLP genotyping with BsuRI (HaeIII) and RsaI restriction enzymes raised doubts regarding this species classification. Sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed that 23 isolates belonged to the species F. johnsoniae and two represented Chryseobacterium spp. The isolates were found to have high-level multidrug resistance: all were resistant to ampicillin and polymyxin B, the 23 F. johnsoniae strains to cotrimoxazole, 88% of them to gentamicin, and 72% to chloramphenicol. The majority of the 25 isolates were sensitive to erythromycin (88%), furazolidone (76%), and florfenicol (68%).

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