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The question how visual art absorbs music has been the subject of much investigation. The reverse question, namely how music absorbs visual art, has until now received little attention. Franz Liszt was perhaps the first to be inspired by visual art in his compositions. The starting point was his encounter with the art of Italy (Sposalizio and Il penseroso in book II of Années de pèlerinage), later followed symphonic poems (Hunnenschlacht based on Kaulbach and Von der Wiege bis zum Grabe probably based on Zichy); his Totentanz for piano and orchestra was inspired by Orcagna and Holbein. In Liszt it is a matter of the poetic content of music and the unification of the arts, where in principle music can be connected not just to literature, but to all branches of the arts. Linked with literature, it reflects the forms and structures of literature. The question is, therefore, whether all this is valid for visual art as well. Does Liszt just compose a ”story,“ or does he also take over the structures of art? And what influence did these works have on later composers?

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provocative dialogue and scenarios – a fundamental element of operetta - did not feature in Chapí’s zarzuela. 40 The operetta features, however, further ensured that Az unatkozó király appealed to the audience. Operetta was a well established musical genre

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). Perceived performance anxiety in advanced musicians specializing in different musical genres . Psychology of Music , 41 ( 1 ), 18 – 41 . Patston , T. , & Loughlan , T. ( 2014

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starts his argument by presenting Rome, specifically the Oratory of San Filippo Neri, as the birthplace of the musical genre and invoking the Rome-born Emilio de’ Cavalieri as the creator of the oldest oratorio, which he considers to be La

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academe. In 1997, Valentina Sandu-Dediu published a monograph that was neither overtly political, nor grounded in Fascist or Communist ideology. 77 The volume covers the stylistic evolution of Beethoven’s musical genres, linked to the relevant aspects of

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