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Myths about “The myths about work addiction”

Commentary on: Ten myths about work addiction (Griffiths et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Cecilie Schou Andreassen, Wilmar B. Schaufeli, and Ståle Pallesen

Introduction Griffiths, Demetrovics, and Atroszko ( 2018 ) present and discuss 10 myths about work addiction/workaholism. Strangely enough, they do so without explicitly defining work addiction. In this paper, we show that

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Ten myths (or facts?) about workaholism: An appetitive motivation framework

Commentary on: Ten myths about work addiction (Griffiths et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Author: Steve Sussman

Introduction The debate paper “Ten myths about work addiction” by Griffiths, Demetrovics, and Atroszko ( 2018 ) intends to provide a debate platform, although it is framed as a narrative review and focuses on 10 potential myths

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Introduction The article Ten myths about work addiction by Griffiths, Demetrovics, and Atroszko ( 2018 ) is a narrative review on work addiction (WA). Today, gambling disorder is the only behavioral addiction in fifth edition

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Mark D. Griffiths, Zsolt Demetrovics, and Paweł A. Atroszko

focuses on 10 myths about work addiction that have permeated the psychological literature (see Table  1 for brief overview). Table 1 . Summary of myths concerning work addiction

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. Cerensodnom, D. (1989): Mongol ardīn domog ülger [Mongolian Folk Myths]. Ulānbātar, Sinĵlex Uxānī Akademīn Xel Joxiolīn Xürēlen, Ulsīn Xewlelīn Gajar. Cleaves, F. W. (1982): The Secret History of the Mongols. Harvard

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How to counter the ten myths about work addiction?: Three postulates for future research

Commentary on: Ten myths about work addiction (Griffiths et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Author: Diana Malinowska

Introduction The ancient myth of Addictus presents a slave whose master set him free, but the slave was so used to his chains that when his master freed him, the slave wandered the land with his chains still intact. Reflecting

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The Batavian myth was the idea that the Dutch people descended from the Batavians, a German tribe which settled in the Low Countries during the first century BC. Their revolt against the Roman rulers in AD 67, recorded in Tacitus' Historiae, remained an inspiration in Dutch historiography and politics up to the nineteenth century. This article focuses on two elements of the Batavian story in connection with Hungarian history. Firstly, the Batavians were soldiers in the Roman army, who encamped in the region of the Danube near Budapest, after having left the Rhine delta. Secondly, the early humanist Dutch chronicler Cornelius Aurelius introduced a Batavian ancestor, a Hungarian prince called Battus. The details of these two independent facts are discussed as part of the history of Dutch-Hungarian relationship.

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La mémoire par les mythes ou la ré-écriture des mythes

Salah Stétié et les mythes méditerranéens

Neohelicon
Author: Efstratia Oktapoda-Lu

Abstract  

In the Mediterranean French-speaking literature, Salah Stétié, the erratic poet with cosmopolitan destiny, embraces the eastern and western banks of the Mediterranean and becomes the perfect mediator between the East and the Occident. On the other side of the Mediterranean, the Memory acts like a catalyst and it fixes the imaginary of the poet who wishes only the Return. Therefore, it is this desire that works out, constructs and illuminates the way the poet operates a true reflection on the memory and the identity through the evocation of the myths and the mythical figures. By a kind of re-actualization of the memory, the myths bridge the world, the country. The author wants to find the union between the man and the world and from his state of exile, he raises questions about his place in the universe. By its dual mythical membership, the Eastern and the Western one, Salah Stétié is also capable to use this ancestral antiquated background which strengthens with its personal capital contribution. In a progressive creative dash, the poet devotes the myth and invents his own myths which propose immutable and eternal values. The renewal and the reformulation of the myth make it possible that the poet restores his perennial and universal dimension.

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Beyond the myths about work addiction: Toward a consensus on definition and trajectories for future studies on problematic overworking

A response to the commentaries on: Ten myths about work addiction (Griffiths et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Paweł A. Atroszko, Zsolt Demetrovics, and Mark D. Griffiths

( Griffiths, Demetrovics, & Atroszko, 2018 ) concerning 10 proposed myths about work addiction (i.e.,  Andreassen, Schaufeli, & Pallesen, 2018 ; Kun, 2018 ; Lior, Abira, & Aviv, 2018 ; Loscalzo & Giannini, 2018a ; Malinowska, 2018 ; Quinones, 2018

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The fragments of Ephippos’ Geryones include a long description of a huge fish cooked by Geryones in a correspondingly oversized casserole (fr. 5). This kind of description is amply paralleled in folktales from around the world concerning gigantic objects. Stories of this type were widely diffused already in antiquity, both in Greece and in the Near East. It is likely that Ephippos’ passage was inspired by the popular narrative tradition of his time. Comparison with the folktale material helps understand the context of fr. 5 and its function in the play. Various traditional elements of Geryones’ myth (his gigantic size, herds of oxen, far-off island, and the cup of Helios used to reach it) are comically reflected in Ephippos’ text, intermingled with folktale motifs. As usually in folk tradition, the description of the giant fish may have been a false tale. It would doubtless stimulate the appetite of Heracles, the central hero of the play, and incite him to travel to Geryones’ land; but the hero would be finally disappointed of the huge meal he expected (a common motif in Attic comedy). Fr. 3 from the same play indicates that “Heracles losing his meal” was a recurrent Leitmotiv in the plot.

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