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's Multiple Roles Chatman, S. 1978. Story and Discourse: Narrative Structure in Fiction and Film. London: Cornell University Press. Story and

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): Transparent Minds: Narrative Modes for Presenting Consciousness in Fiction. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Transparent Minds: Narrative Modes for Presenting Consciousness in Fiction

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-Evaluation. Personality and Social Psychology, 30, 5, 594–604. Genette, G. (1980) Narrative Discourse . Blackwell, Oxford Gergen, K., J. (1973) Social psychology as history. Journal of

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RICOEUR, P. (1984-1987): Time and Narrative. Vols I-III. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Time and Narrative I

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Narrative recall in the elderly

Content, fluency and speech errors in the narrative speech of young, young-old and old-old speakers

Acta Linguistica Hungarica
Author: Judit Bóna

Adams, Cynthia, Malcolm C. Smith, Linda Nyquist and Marion Perlmutter. 1997. Adult age-group differences in recall for the literal and interpretive meanings of narrative text. Journal of Gerontology 52. 187

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. McDowell J. H. Children’s Riddling 1979 Metsvahi , Merili 2002: Inimene ja narratiiv: Püha Jüri legendi näitel [Man and Narrative. On the Example of the Legend of St George], in

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. Empirical Studies of the Arts 16 179 191 Gergen, K. J. and Gergen, M. M. (1988): Narrative and the self as

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): Narrative organisation of social representations. Papers on Social Representations , 6, (2), 93-190. MOSCOVICI, S. (1984): The phenomenon of social representations. In Farr, R. and Moscovici, S. (eds): Social

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, D. E. (1988): Narrative Knowing and the Human Sciences. Albany: SUNY Press. Narrative Knowing and the Human Sciences. Pólya T. (2003): Az

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live there, form the foundation of several genres of oral literature. Verbal charms, as “traditional verbal forms intended by their effect on supernature to bring about change in the world in which we live” ( ROPER 2003 :8), and belief narratives, as

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