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Abstract  

The profound narrativization of contemporary culture in the large-scale “Narrative Turn” forces narratology to leave the paradigm established on the study of the novel, and a general narratology that embraces all kinds of narratives is urgently called for. The “fundamental retrospectiveness” for the definition of the narrative becomes an obstacle for such a narratology. This essay proposes a new definition for the minimal narrative by removing the “recounting” part, and, based on the new definition, an all-narrative typology as distinguished by three criteria: factuality/fictionality, media, and moods (intentional temporality). Finally the essay attempts a detailed analysis of the live television news since they occupy an important position in today’s culture and emphasizes that the uncertainty of the plot could lead to recycling of intention.

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, the spirit and state of human civilization in history [ 8 ]. 2.2 Architectural narratology Narrative, as a basic way of human cognition of the world and social communication, has

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De Jong , I. J. F.: Metalepsis in Ancient Greek Literature. In Grethlein, J. – Rengakos, A.: Narratology and Interpretation. The Content of Narrative Form in Ancient Literature . Berlin – New York 2009, 87

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Narratology does not distinguish between original and translated fiction. Indeed, narratological models, such as the one proposed by Chatman (1990:74) do not pay any attention to the translator. Since the 1990's, the visibility of translators in translated narrative texts has been increasingly discussed and researchers like Schiavi (1996) and Hermans (1996) introduced the concept of the translator's voice, which attempts to recognise the 'other' voice in translation, i.e., the presence of the translator. Corpus-based translation studies have also focused on recurrent features of translated language (see, for example, Baker 1993, Kenny 2001; Laviosa 1997; Olohan & Baker 2000), and corpus techniques and tools are being employed to identify the translators' 'style' in their translations (Baker 2000). Bosseaux (2004) seeks to define the nature of the translator's discursive presence by exploring certain narratological aspects of the relation between originals and translations. This investigation is particularly concerned with the potential problems involved in the translation of linguistic features that constitute the notion of point of view, i.e., deixis, modality, transitivity and free indirect discourse, and seeks to determine whether and how the translator's choices affect the transfer of narratological structures. This paper looks specifically at the translation of free indirect discourse in To the Lighthouse and its three French translations: Promenade au Phare (1929) translated by Maurice Lanoire, Voyage au Phare (1993) by Magali Merle and Vers le Phare (1996) by Françoise Pellan.

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Chapter nine of Dezso Kosztolányi's 1933 work, Esti Kornél, lends itself to multiple interpretations, none complete or exhaustive. It is possible to look at this story from the perspective of the other - the Bulgarian train conductor - and it is possible to analyze it as an allegorical, danteesque descent into an inferno in which the Bulgarian train conductor is a guide, a kalauz, to Esti Kornél. A look at the story from the perspective of narratology would yield rich results, as would a rhetorical approach. I propose an analysis of this story through the prism of translation. It reveals that this is a type prose very much akin to poetry: in it, linguistic form is at least as important as semantic content, if not more. Here, the recognition of formal patterns leads to semantic discoveries. In this chapter, language has become the protagonist that manipulates the other characters. Translation points most straightforwardly to this fact because it is in translation that the loss and, therefore, the presence of the original's linguistic form is most acutely felt. The problems raised in translation illustrate how this text poses critical questions about linguistic and cultural relativism, about the nature of translation, about the possibility of communication between different linguistic communities as well as between individuals who share linguistic and cultural values.

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Заметки на полях романа Тургенева Накануне

Studia Slavica
Author:
Иштван Фрид

The object of this study is the analysis of the novel of Turgenev ( On the Eve , 1860, Nakanune ), the study concentrates on the relations of literature and music. The protagonists of the novel are listening to the opera of Verdi ( Traviata ). The death in Venice is present in the life and on the stage.

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Abstract

The article sets forth two different methodological models. The first one follows the accepted patterns and rules of speaking. According to this, the aims, attitudes, and motivations of the participating actors, as well as the thematic implications and external, factual references of the topic become evident during the speech event. These observations explain why and how experiences are elaborated, shared, and transmitted. This model of speaking culture was established by Dell Hymes (ethnography of speaking). In the second kind of speech situation, the researcher observes the communication between individuals who do not know each other and investigates the self-representational aims and strategies of the speakers. This model follows ethnomethodological points (E. Goffman).

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In this paper, I establish a connection between the manifold character of Fama as reported by Virgil in Aen. 4. 173 ff. and her ‘manifold speech’ (multiplex sermo) in the framework of a narratological reading. According to my interpretation, the short fama of the Virgilian Fama (4. 191-194), as a spectacular example of ‘polyphonic narrative’, radicalises and thus domesticates the dangers inherent in the epic discourse itself.

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The paper approaches to Mikszáth's novel as a dialogic structure, a kind of double plot novel. The plots of the first and second chapter with different setting and personage meet in the third chapter and start coalescing. But these different plots represent two different worlds where also the workings of time is different and the human activity has different dynamics. The paper discusses in some detail the possibility of the analysis of time in fiction, since the scholarly discourse on the topic seems to deny the possibility that time can work in different ways in fictional worlds and describes the specialities of fictional time as anomalies of narration. The encounter of the worlds in Mikszáth's novel is represented as a fight with no real winner, which can be regarded as a sort of dialogue.

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In this essay, I interpret two Hungarian novels from the field of Holocaust literature concentrating upon the problems of representation. I argue that neither Kertész nor Márton can avoid facing the question whether the challenges of remembering and representation can be bound and reflected in a literary form. Past events are repeatedly narrated in present tense in both novels. For Márton, the fragments of narration do not constitute a story, and the invasion of imaginative elements provokes the conventional frames of depicting historical facts in an epistemological horizon. On the other hand, in Fateless storytelling emphasises the inconceivable character of the Holocaust, and Kertész's work sheds light on philosophical paradoxes beyond epistemology. In this sense these two novels prove to be different but connected forms of Holocaust literature.

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