Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 454 items for :

  • "non-destructive" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

) Dynamic method for quick and non-destructive measurement of the surface firmness of fruits and vegetables. Hungarian Agricultural Engineering 12 , 29 – 30 . Felföldi , J. and A

Restricted access

Introduction Metallography proved to be a powerful tool in the analysis of archaeological alloys, although destructive sampling raises ethical issues. 1 For this reason, we involved completely non-invasive and non-destructive techniques in this

Restricted access

Water content of dry sausages may decrease due to improper ripening and storage as well. As a consequence, an outer crust appears on the surface of the products. The aim of the industry is either to eliminate the presence of outer crust, or decrease its occurrence. The thickness of outer crust can be estimated by non-destructive ultrasound technique. As the propagation time and attenuation of ultrasonic waves vary in the materials with different water content, the thickness of outer crust and the normal texture, respectively, can be estimated on the basis of these characteristics. The propagation and attenuation values are typical for the given layers. Thus, by measuring total attenuation and total width of the product, the thickness of outer crust can be calculated by means of the velocity and attenuation coefficients of ultrasonic waves. Results of this non-destructive measurement may support the proper adjustment of ripening and storage parameters such as temperature and humidity.

Restricted access

manufacturing and industrial in particular civil engineering [ 1 ]. Acoustic non-destructive assessment of rebar corrosion is a hazard can suddenly cause a rather dramatic catastrophic failure especially for reinforced concrete structures, a proposed non-destructive

Restricted access

Felföldi , J. & Ignát , T. (1999): Dynamic method for quick and non-destructive measurement of the surface firmness of fruits and vegetables. Hungarian Agricultural Engineering , 12 , 29–30. Ignát T

Restricted access

Summary  

There is a growing interest in the application of scientific-physical, chemical etc. methods in archaeology. This is partly due to the fact that classical archaeology, based upon the form, style, decoration of the objects has reached its limits, to obtain new result and, the integration of other disciplines into the argumentation of archaeologists is needed. The other important reason is the development and availability of methods and equipment for non-destructive analyses, ways of gathering useful information on the chemical and mineral composition, age, and state of preservation of the objects which can be useful in their scientific appraisal. PGAA is one of the techniques eminently suited for this purpose.

Restricted access
Community Ecology
Authors:
G. Ónodi
,
Gy. Kröel-Dulay
,
E. Kovács-Láng
,
P. Ódor
,
Z. Botta-Dukat
,
B. Lhotsky
,
S. Barabás
,
J. Garadnai
, and
M. Kertész

. Whitbeck , M. and Grace , J.B. 2006 . Evaluation of non-destructive methods for estimating biomass in marshes of the upper Texas, USA coast . Wetlands 26 : 278 – 282

Restricted access

Abstract  

Non-destructive evaluation of concrete is an important task of quality control in building construction industry. The quality evaluation of concrete samples was carried out using prompt gamma ray activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. In this study calcium and silicon contents of six concrete samples were determined through yield of 1.94 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 3.54 MeV gamma-rays from silicon. The concrete samples were prepared by mixing cement, coarse and fine aggregates in different proportions. A linear correlation has been observed between the experimental yield of the prompt gamma rays and the actual calcium and silicon concentration in the concrete samples. Results of this study have demonstrated successful use of an accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of the concrete samples.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Application of a portable radioisotope X-ray fluorescence analyser for the determination of nickel in iron meteorites is described. The error of the XRF method was ±0.5% Ni at the 95% confidence level, which was confirmed by comparison with the results of other authors. In spite of limited accuracy this version of the radioisotope XRF method may find a wide application in meteorite studies, for rapid and non-destructive verification and classification of collected meteorite specimens.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
M. Kubo
,
H. Moriyama
,
Y. Tsuruoka
,
S. Sakamoto
,
E. Koseto
,
T. Saito
, and
K. Nishiyama

Abstract  

An elemental analysis method using muonic X-rays has been developed. Applying the unique features of the negative muon, this method enables elemental distribution in an object to be obtained three dimensionally and non-destructively. Especially, by choosing the incident muon beam energy, depth-profiling as deep as several cm from the surface can be achieved by detecting the high energy muonic X-rays carrying the information of the atom which captured the muon. We obtained some preliminary results and showed the applicability of the technique in future analytical facilities.

Restricted access