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1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Discontinuous Phrases or Hyperbata Discontinuities in noun phrases within the Vulgate are in clear opposition between the original Hebrew and Latin translation, since such word orders are impossible in the Hebrew language, in

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. Cambridge , Cambridge University Press . Anyidoho , Akosua . 1990 . On tone in Akan compound nouns . Paper presented at the the 19th West African Languages Congress

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References Aarts , Jan M. G. and Josepf P. Calbert . 1979 . Metaphor and non-metaphor: The semantics of adjective–noun combinations . Tübingen : Niemeyer . Annaz , Dagmara , Jo Van Herwegen , Michael Thomas , Roza Fishman

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This paper shows that there is a subclass of adjectives in Japanese called adjectival nouns, which consists of adjectives mostly of foreign origin, and this subset of the adjectives is required to undergo nominalization by the merger of a null nominalizing suffix. This process of nominalization takes place either prior to the PF interface or at PF, depending on the types of null nominalizing suffixes that merge with adjectival nouns. The proposed multilevel nominalization analysis has desirable consequences for adjectival nouns, and can also be extended to a subclass of verbs in Japanese, which likewise are typically of foreign origin.

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It is possible to identify three dominant inflectional paradigms of the noun in singular which are in principle implied by the grammatical gender: masculine, feminine, and neuter. Only masculine nouns ending in -a follow the same inflectional pattern as feminine nouns. Neuter nouns exhibit numerous common features with the masculine inflection. In plural, due to the neutralisation of grammatical oppositions and syncretism of inflectional forms, the majority of nouns are inflected according to one paradigm. Only masculine nouns with personal reference obtain in nominative and accusative endings different than those of the remaining nouns, which is also stressed by the formal exponents of their attributes.

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The paper explores the nature of cross-linguistic influence in morphology. 30 Estonian (a closely related L1) and 30 Russian (a non-related L1) beginning and advanced learners of L2 Finnish were tested for their skills in nominal inflection in three different tasks: separate nouns of morphophonologically varying inflectional categories to be inflected in several plural case forms in writing, the same nouns to be used in a narrative writing task and in an oral inflection task. The nouns were selected to represent various degrees of inflectional and/or semantic similarity between Finnish and Estonian (for Russian no such similarity exists). The results indicate that—in opposition to what has been previously claimed—not only does cross-linguistic influence exist within the domain of morphology but it also varies systematically across inflectional categories and between groups at different levels of general skills in Finnish.

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Allomorphy is a phenomenon that occurs in many languages. Several psycholinguistic studies have shown that allomorphy, if present, co-determines cognitive processing. In the present paper we discuss allomorphic variations of Serbian instrumental singular form of pseudo-nouns as emerging from analogical learning. We compare the predictions derived from memory-based language processing models with results from a previous experimental study with adult Serbian native speakers. Results confirm that the production of suffix allomorphs in Serbian instrumental singular masculine nouns can be accounted for by memory-based learning and simple analogical inferences. The present findings are in line with a growing body of research showing that memory-based learning models make relevant predictions about the cognitive processes involved in various linguistic phenomena.

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Summary  

The present study presents a semi-automatic method for parsing and filtering of noun phrases from citation contexts of concept symbols. The purpose of the method is to extract contextual, agreed upon, and pertinent noun phrases, to be used in visualization studies for naming clusters (concept groups) or concept symbols. The method is applied in a case study, which forms part of a larger dissertation work concerning the applicability of bibliometric methods for thesaurus construction. The case study is carried out within periodontology, a specialty area of dentistry. The result of the case study indicates that the method is able to identify highly important noun phrases, and that these phrases accurately describe their parent clusters. Hence, the method is able to reduce the labour intensive work of manual citation context analysis, though further refinements are still needed.

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The opinion of traditional grammars and the hypothetical derived PIE form is inconsistent as concerns the quantity of the sing. nominative-accusative ending of Latin u-stem neuters. Since the received scholarly opinion holds that the quantity cannot be determinated from the available sources, certain scholars have stated that the ending is a short -u. A comprehensive re-examination of the ancient grammatical opinion and the relevant metrical texts demonstrates that on the basis of two passages, namely Aen. XI 859 and nux 106, the truth of the traditional view, i.e., that the sing. nom.-acc. of u-stem neuters is long, can be confirmed.

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, Verner, 2001, „Kinship Nouns in Possessive Constructions in Italian and Scandinavian”, ms. Giannini, Stefania, 2001, „I possessivi in Toscana”, in A. Zamboni / P. del Puente / M. T. Vigolo (a c.di), La dialettologia

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