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To investigate the nutritional characteristics of purple wheat, 41 kinds of nutrients were measured in seven purple wheat lines using one white wheat variety as control sample. Correlation analysis of nutrient contents was performed. Results show that the amounts of 40 kinds of nutrients in the purple wheat lines are higher than those of the control. For example, the amounts of sodium (Na) and manganese (Mn) in purple wheat are higher than the standards by 311.77–2017.65% and 548.15–733.33%, respectively; the contents of β + γ-vitamin E is higher than the standards by 300%; and zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), and potassium (K) are all higher than the control by 100%. Therefore, the purple wheat has obvious advantages in terms of the nutrient contents. Correlation analysis studies show that protein has significant positive correlations with Glu, Mo, Pro, Fe, Tyr and Ile. Anthocyanin has significant positive correlations with Mo and Glu, and significant negative correlations with free Trp and Ca. Carotenoid has significant positive correlations with His, Lys, Val, Leu, Arg, Gly and I, and significant negative correlations with Ca. This paper is a first report on comprehensive nutrients of several purple wheat lines. Our results suggest that purple wheat is rich in nutrients and there are many significant correlations among different nutrients. The valuable information is very useful in biofortification breeding and functional food development.

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The effect of four NPK fertilizer rates (NPK[1:1:1]: 0, 300, 600, 900 kg active ingredients·ha -1 ) was studied on the growth of maize and on weed infestation - bio-mass production and nutrient uptake of weeds - in four replications in a 35-year old long-term maize continuous cropping field experiment (Keszthely, Hungary). The weed flora was recorded on 1 June, 2003 in the 6-8-leaf development stage of maize. The effect of the increasing rates of fertilizers was analyzed and evaluated from the results of biomass production as well as the nutrient uptake of weeds and maize, respectively. On the experimental plots 9 weed species were registered at the date of sampling, from which 4 species were perennial and 5 species were annual ones. All the weeds were collected from 1 m² areas of each plot and the different weed species were separated from each other. The fresh and dry weights of the canopy of maize and the different weed species were measured. The nutrient (NPK) contents of maize and weed samples were measured in the laboratory. Total and species scale nutrient concentration, as well as per-unit nutrient uptake of maize and weeds were compared. The increasing rates of mineral fertilizers had a significant effect on the biomass production and on the nutrient uptake of weeds. Significant differences were also found between the biomass production and nutrient uptake of the different weed species.

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Field experiments were conducted during the summer (February-May) and south west monsoon (June-September) seasons of 1996 and 1997 at the Aliyarnagar Agricultural Research Station of Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India, to study the growth and yield of soybean in response to irrigation, composted coir pith, time of N, P, K application and use of a nutrient mixture spray. The results revealed that irrigation at 0.90 IW/CPE [ratio of Irrigation Water Depth (IW) to Cumulative Pan Evaporation (CPE)], the application of composted coir pith and the split application of N, P and K in conjunction with a nutrient mixture spray significantly increased the plant height, leaf area index, dry matter production and grain yield of soybean. However, the root length of soybean was significantly reduced by irrigating at 0.90 IW/CPE (compared to irrigation at 0.70 IW/CPE and 0.50 IW/CPE) and by the application of composted coir pith.

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processing implications of nutrient bioavailability. -in: Proceedings of bioavailability’ 93 . Part 1, Bundesfoschunganstalt für Ernährung, Ettlingen, Karlsruhe, pp. 202–212. Favier A

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of glycogen accumulating bacteria in treating nutrient-deficient wastewater . Water Sci. Technol. , 46 , 185 – 190 . JOBBÁGY , A. , LITERÁTHY

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. Plant Soil 257 : 425 – 433 . Antil , R.S. , Narwal , R.P. , Singh , B. , Singh , J.P. 2011 . Integrated nutrient management for sustainable soil health and crop

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–3 ): 616 – 645 . Gerardo , M. L. , Zacharof , M. P. , Lovitt , R. W. ( 2013 ) Strategies for the recovery of nutrients and metals from anaerobically digested dairy farm sludge using

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Johan Thevelein, Beatriz Bonini, Dries Castermans, Steven Haesendonckx, Johan Kriel, Wendy Louwet, Palvannan Thayumanavan, Yulia Popova, Marta Rubio-Texeira, Wim Schepers, Patrick Vandormael, Griet Zeebroeck, Peter Verhaert, Matthias Versele, and Karin Voordeckers

Holsbeeks, I., Lagatie, O., Van Nuland, A., Van de Velde, S., Thevelein, J. M.: The eukaryotic plasma membrane as a nutrient-sensing device. Trends Biochem Sci 29 , 556–564 (2004

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Jayaram, N. S., Seshachalam, B., Hanumantappa, Chittaranjan, S. 1982: Plant nutrient losses by water erosion from the cultivated rainfed vertisols of Bellary. Indian J. Soil Cons. , 10 , 54-59. Plant nutrient losses by water

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14 Gunes, A., Post, W. N. K., Kirkby, E. A., Aktas, M. 1994: Influence of partial replacement of nitrate by amino acid nitrogen or urea in the nutrient medium on nitrate accumulation in NFT

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