Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 65 items for :

  • "osteoblast" x
  • All content x
Clear All

Bakker, A., Klein-Nulend, J. (2003) Osteoblast isolation from murine calvariae and long bones. Methods Mol. Med. 80 , 19–28. Klein-Nulend J

Restricted access
Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Gyöngyi Kirschner, Bernadett Balla, János Kósa, Péter Horváth, Andrea Kövesdi, Gergely Lakatos, István Takács, Zsolt Nagy, Bálint Tóbiás, Kristóf Árvai, and Péter Lakatos

inhibits proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and promotes early but not late osteoblast differentiation in vitro. J. Bone Miner. Metab., 2012, 30 (1), 119–123. 3

Open access

Abstract  

Interaction of acid and acid+alkali treated titanium samples with simulated body fluid was studied. In case of alkali treated titanium, the dynamic arrangement of the test enabled the detection of primary calcium and phosphate ion adsorption from the solution and later apatite crystal growth (XRD). The induction time for crystal growth was 24.20.3 h. On acid-only treated titanium no crystal growth was detected. The calcium phosphate adsorption layer formed on the acid treated samples was detectable by XPS only, however it differed from that one formed on the acid+alkali treated samples. The adsorption layer formed on the acid+alkali treated samples contained larger amount of calcium, especially in the shortest exposure times. Charging of the apatite crystallites during the XPS measurement enabled the determination their Ca/P ratio separately from Ca/P ratio of the adsorption layers. XPS and EDS analyses indicated that the spherulitic crystallites consisted of carbonated hydroxyapatite with the Ca/P ratio close to that one of the stoichiometric hydroxyapatite. It is proposed that the adsorption layer formed spontaneously and immediately on the acid+alkali treated titanium can provide an ideal interface between the metal implant and the apatite cement line, the first structure formed by osteoblast cells during the formation of the new bone on foreign surfaces.

Restricted access

osteoblasts. J. Biol. Chem. 281, 4326–4333 (2006) Xing L. Tumor necrosis factor promotes Runx2 degradation through up-regulation of Smurf1 and Smurf2 in osteoblasts

Restricted access
Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Áron Lazáry, Bernadett Balla, János Kósa, Krisztián Bácsi, Zsolt Nagy, István Takács, Péter Pál Varga, Gábor Speer, and Péter Lakatos

Sidqui, M., Collin, P., Vitte, C. és mtsai: Osteoblast adherence and resorption activity of isolated osteoclasts on calcium sulphate hemihydrate. Biomaterials, 1995, 16 , 1327. Vitte C

Restricted access

Hormone Res. 2009 71 134 138 Clemens, T. L., Karsenty, G.: The osteoblast: an

Restricted access

fractures: Current aspects of management. Injury, 2007, 38 (6), 649–650. Rust, P. A., Kalsi, P., Briggs, T. W., et al.: Will mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into osteoblasts on allograft? Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res

Open access

409 416 Naot, D., Bava, U., Matthews, B. és mtsai: Differential gene expression in cultured osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells from patients with Paget

Restricted access
Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Barbara Buday, Enikő Kulcsár, Botond Literáti Nagy, Tünde Horváth, Márta Vitai, Istvánné Vecsei, Katalin Bezzegh, József Kiss, Éva Péterfai, László Koltay, and László Korányi

Thommesen, L., Stunes, A. K., Monjo, M. és mtsai: Expression and regulation of resistin in osteoblast and osteoclast indicate a role in bone metabolism. J. Cel. Biochem., 2006, 99 , 824–834. Monjo M

Restricted access
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: Gábor Skaliczki, M. Weszl, K. Schandl, T. Major, M. Kovács, J. Skaliczki, H. Redl, M. Szendrői, K. Szigeti, D. Máté, Cs Dobó-Nagy, and Zs Lacza

Purpose: The clinical demand for bone grafting materials necessitated the development of animal models. Critical size defect model has been criticized recently, mainly for its inaccuracy. Our objective was to develop a dependable animal model that would provide compromised bone healing, and would allow the investigation of bone substitutes. Methods: In the first group a critical size defect was created in the femur of adult male Wistar rats, and a non-critical defect in the remaining animals (Groups II, III and IV). The defect was left empty in group II, while in groups III and IV a spacer was interposed into the gap. Osteoblast activity was evaluated by NanoSPECT/CT imaging system. New bone formation and assessment of a union or non-union was observed by μCT and histology. Results: The interposition model proved to be highly reproducible and provided a bone defect with compromised bone healing. Significant bone regeneration processes were observed four weeks after removal of the spacer. Conclusion: Our results have shown that when early bone healing is inhibited by the physical interposition of a spacer, the regeneration process is compromised for a further 4 weeks and results in a bone defect during the time-course of the study.

Restricted access