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A preliminary report of the international research project on a Greek papyrus fragment from Ptolemaic Egypt (first half or middle of the second century BC) P. Vindob. G60514-60518.

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The analysis of three small hieratic papyrus fragments coming from a secondary burial place (Tomb B) in the outer courtyard of TT 32 shows that the otherwise rare custom of attaching the papyrus to the outer surfaces of mummy linen via a resinous substance was not only occurring in Ptolemaic Akhmim but is thus attested in Thebes too.

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This paper reveals the vicissitudinous history of the Athenogenes-papyrus and its edition by Eugène Revillout and other scholars. By reconstructing the sequence of events between 1888 and 1893 one can get a convincing explanation of disturbing features in the frames containing the papyrus fragments. Slight misallocations and dislocations due to the rushed final fixing had far reaching consequences in later editions of the famous Hyperides text until now. One of the most important new readings of the Athenogenes-speech partly due to the investigation of the first editions is given in the Appendix (Hyp. Ath . col. XVI. line 1).

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In the first book of his history, Herodotus interrupts his political narrative to offer a quick ethnographic survey of the Persians, wherein he remarks that Persians respect other ethnicities in proportion to their proximity to Persia and reserve their greatest disdain for the most distant peoples. For Herodotus and his 5th-century Greek audience, the Persian himself incarnates the category of the Barbarian, whose inferiority is a function of his distance from Greece. This article proposes to assess the role of ethnocentrism, and its correlation of proximity and superiority, in two of the most iconoclastic figures in the history of Western thought, the ancient Greek sophist Antiphon of Rhamnus and the French Renaissance author Michel de Montaigne. Recently excavated and edited papyrus fragments reveal tantalizing glimpses of Antiphon’s lost treatise On truth, which seems to formulate a very far-reaching critique of ethnocentrism within the framework of cultural relativism. In his renowned essay Des Cannibales (“Of Cannibals”), Montaigne formulates a remarkably similar critique in his portrayal of the Brazilians encountered by Europeans in their trans-Atlantic voyages of the 16th century. Both authors take their distance from normative cultural values in order to rethink the relation of proximity and superiority, but Montaigne adds a temporal dimension to his analysis by challenging our condescension to the past. The vicinity of Montaigne and Antiphon suggests a similar intuition into the reversibility of cultural values and the contingency of collective identity in space and time.

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A Barlám és Jozafát regény 26-27. fejezetében Nákhór ál-tanúságtétele nem más, mint Aristeidés eltűntnek hitt Apológiájának átirata. A tanulmány az Apologia utóéletének áttekintése, és a „kölcsönzött szöveg" elbeszélésen belüli szerepének vizsgálatán túl, a védőbeszéd Iviron kódexben megőrzött - ez- idáig kiadatlan - görög és ófrancia nyelvű változatából is közöl részleteket.

The speech in the Barlaam and Josaphat novel, Nachor’s pseudo-testimony, is in fact a transcription of Aristides’ Apology, previously thought to be lost. Although it is mentioned by Eusebius and St. Jerome, the sermon was considered lost until 1878. In the 19th century, Armenian and Syriac translations came to light, as well as Greek papyrus fragments, also preserving excerpts from the original text of the sermon. In the light of the Greek fragments, it became clear that the romanced saint’s biography Barlaam and Josaphat also preserved a metaphrase of the sermon in Greek. Codex Iviron 463, which contains the Greek abridged version of the Barlaam novel, includes not only the Greek transcription of the Apology, but also its Old French translation. In addition to an overview of the afterlife of the Apology and an examination of the role of the “loaned text” within the narrative, this paper will also provide extracts from the heretofore unpublished Greek and Old French versions of the apology preserved in the Iviron codex.

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land that gave the greatest amount of material. There were a few factors that favoured the preservation of a large number of papyrus fragments in Egypt. 1. The main factor was related to the dry climate

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Lásd F. G. Kenyon: Papyrus Fragments of Hyperides and Demosthenes. CR 6 (1892) 288–289; 429–430. 13 A Tancock-töredékeket ma a Rossall Schoolban (Fleetwood, Lancaster) őrzik, ahol Charles Coverdale

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Rezension ( Gnomon [2008] 204–210, bes. 209) zu Whiteheads Kommentar (Anm. 9). 13 Siehe Kenyon, F. G. : Papyrus Fragments of Hyperides and Demosthenes. CR 6 (1892) 288–289, 429–430. 14 Die Tancock-Fragmente werden heute in der Rossall School (Fleetwood

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F. G. Kenyon: Papyrus Fragments of Hyperides and Demosthenes. CR 6 (1892) 288-289; 429-430. 36 Jensen (VI.) a tekercs tartalmának (108. 12.) leltári számát rendeli ezekhez a töredékekhez. 37 Kenyon leírása szerint legalábbis így történt. 38 Tancock

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