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This paper presents an exploratory study on translators’ decisions when encountering food-related translation difficulties in a parallel corpus of German original narrative texts and their translations into Spanish and Catalan. For this purpose, all food- and drink-related lexemes in the German original texts were extracted and classified in semantic groups. As a second step, the source and target text fragments of lexemes related to foodrelated cultural referents, metaphorical expressions or ways of eating and drinking were extracted and analysed in view of the techniques applied by the translators of both language combinations. The results obtained through the classification and quantification of the translation techniques in these three domains allow conclusions to be drawn regarding a) the existence of foreignizing or domesticating tendencies in the translation of food terms, b) the ways translators deal with action verbs that encompass multiple meaning aspects and c) the degree of metaphoricity and food-relatedness in the translation of metaphorical expressions.

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. 2013 . ‘That is so cool’: Investigating the Translation of Adverbial Intensifiers in English–Spanish Dubbing through a Parallel Corpus of Sitcoms. Perspectives . Studies in Translatology Vol. 21 . No. 4 . 526 – 542

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The paper focuses on a textual shift that was observed in a comparison between the Italian nominalized infinitive and its Slovene translations. The nominalized infinitive essentially allows a process to be worded as a nominal structure, while (at least partly) retaining its verbal nature; in the framework of systemic functional grammar, it is explained as a type of grammatical metaphor, i.e. nominalization. The absence of a parallel structure in the grammar of Slovene requires the translator to look for other means of expression. A corpus analysis, carried out with the aid of a parallel corpus which comprises both literary and non-literary Italian texts and their Slovene translations, shows that the dual (nominal and verbal) nature of the nominalized infinitive is reflected in two main types of translation equivalents and several minor ones. It is argued that the strategies displayed in the choice of these translation equivalents can be viewed as instances of obligatory explicitation, either norm-governed or strategic. Thus the main goals of the paper are to identify the textual shifts and strategies found in the parallel corpus and to see whether they can be explained as manifestations of explicitation.

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. Čermák , F. & Rosen , A. 2012 . The Case of InterCorp, a Multilingual Parallel Corpus . International Journal of Corpus Linguistics Vol. 13 . No. 3 . 411 – 427

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. – Rura , L. – Desmet , P. – Vandeweghe , W. 2007 . Dutch Parallel Corpus . A multilingual annotated corpus. In: Proceedings of Corpus Linguistics. Birmingham: United Kingdom. 9

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. 2013 . ‘That is so Cool’: Investigating the Translation of Adverbial Intensifiers in English–Spanish Dubbing through a Parallel Corpus of Sitcoms . In: Perspectives: Studies in Translatology Vol. 21 . No. 4 . 526 – 542

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. Corpus linguistics comes of age. The English-Norwegian Parallel Corpus. http://www.hf.uio.no/iba/prosjekt.

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– 266 . Auwera , J. V. D. , Schalley , E. & Nuyts , J. 2005 . Epistemic Possibility in a Slavonic Parallel Corpus – A Pilot Study . In: Karlik , P. & Hansen , B

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source texts and their translations, we will use the English‒Polish parallel corpus Paralela (Pęzik 2016), which is available at http://paralela.clarin-pl.eu . The parallel corpus under scrutiny includes approximately 262 million word tokens in 10

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In this paper, we will try to grasp the elusive and controversial concept of explicitness which has been considered from different perspectives in linguistics and will take a special look at different approaches in translation and interpretation studies. Thereby, the often postulated assumption that explicitness is a universal feature appearing in all kinds and all instances of language mediation will be questioned. We will show that explicitness does not result from the translation or interpreting process per se but that other factors (also) need to be taken into account, especially conventional differences between the languages involved and the different interpreting strategies of the interpreters. Our investigation is based on data from a parallel corpus of German-English popular science texts and a corpus of interpreter-mediated discourse in a conference setting.

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