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The paper aims to deal with the problem of “homonymy” in Origen’s work from the point of logic. As far as Origen is concerned, this term expresses the difference between the literal and non-literal meanings of various Scriptural texts. Therefore, homonymy can be regarded as a primitive linguistic entity for the interpretation of the Scripture. Origen’s use of this term shows that a considerable part of the tools he classifies into the arsenal of logic is in close connection with linguistic entities, that is, with the Scripture. Nevertheless, as in the case of the difference between the literal and non-literal sense of the statements and commands of the Scripture, so too in connection with homonymy, the question of truth and falsity may emerge. Therefore, in this sense, homonymy has a logical character as well.

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Az Ex 34,29 jeromosi megközelítését régóta elveti a tudományos közvélemény. A ma elfogadott fordítások alapja egy, a Vulgatában követett héber változattól valószínűleg különböző olvasat, valamint a Hab 3,4 vitatható értelmezése: egyik sem elegendő ahhoz, hogy az elterjedt latin változat fölött ítéletet mondjunk. A részlet nyelvi közegének és a patrisztikus kor exegetikai gyakorlatának vizsgálata átgondoltnak mutatja a Vulgata megoldását, az utókor zsidó, illetve keresztény kommentárjaiban kifejtett magyarázatok pedig az eltérő fordítási és értelmezési hagyományok kölcsönös életképességét példázzák.

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fragmentary manuscripts and citations from patristic and liturgical sources. From these I have chosen four Latin Fathers for their relative abundance of material and chronological representation covering the 3rd and 4th centuries: Tertullian of Carthage

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Abstract

Art historical and ethnographic literature has elaborated in detail the cultic history and iconography of Christ as Apothecary, the first synthesis of which theme does credit to Wolfgang-Hagen Hein. He found the patristic roots of the theme in St Augustine's Easter sermon “De doctrina christianae”, in which Christ is “ipse medicus”, “ipsa medicina” (doctor and medicine himself). In his book of 2002 Fritz Krafft also addressed himself to the theme. He names the eucharist, the oil and wine of the chemist as signs of the catholic sacramental liturgy. The ethnographic implications were exposed by Lenz Kriss-Rettenbeck and Leopold Schmidt. The earliest representation is the illumination in a manuscript of around 1519–1528 in which Christ is writing out a prescription for the first parents Adam and Eve. The picture type was disseminated in oil and glass paintings over the 17th and 18th centuries. The listed works are complemented with the presented copperplate engravings in the author's collection and the painted picture from the one-time pharmacy of the Ursulines in Vienna.

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Hieronymus (Szent Jeromos) Szent Gellért csanádi püspök exegetikai munkájának, a Deliberatió nak ( Gerardi Moresenae aecclesiae seu Csanadiensis episcopi Deliberatio supra hymnum trium puerorum , Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München, Clm 6211, ed. Gabriel Silagi, in CCCM 29, 1978, ed. Karácsonyi Béla – Szegfű László 1999) egyik legfontosabb patrisztikus forrása. A tanulmány kimutatja, hogy a Deliberatio két szöveghelye részben szó szerinti idézet, részben parafrázis Victorinus poetoviumi (ma: ptuji) püspök Szent Jeromos által átdolgozott Apocalypsis-kommentárjából ( Commentarii in Apocalypsin editio Victorini et recensio Hieronymiuna cum posteriorum additamentis, rec. I. Haussleiter, in CSEL 49, 1916).

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. Haifa, pp. 87–94 (in Hebrew). Rubenson, Samuel (1996a): Translating the Tradition: Some Remarks on the Arabization of the Patristic Heritage in Egypt. Medieval Encounter 2,1, pp. 4

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from Coptic to Arabic, to be published in The Jubilee Volume in Honor of Prof. George Kanazi . Rubenson, Samuel (1996a): Translating the Tradition: Some Remarks on the Arabization of the Patristic Heritage in

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The paper bellow aims at presenting and discussing Father Pavel Florensky's  Sophiology on the basis of his theodicy concentrated in his doctorial dissertation published in 1914 which contains scrupulously detailed argumentations. Summarising his views concerning a positive approach to the utmost essential function and mission of philosophy, i.e. revealing the Higher Truth, Florensky points out his belief that it unquestionably belongs to the sphere of the Transcendent. Truth, which thus is knowledgeable exclusively via scrutinising the nature of the Holy Spirit (here Florensky intensely disputes Kantian agnosticism), is consequently to be observed as the indivisible single whole. The author attempts to systematise the ancient tradition of Sophia, which has been existent in a latent fashion in Russian mentality, by throwing some light upon both its roots to be traced back in the Old Testament and in patristics, and in Russian iconography. Florensky's work, whose unique impact on turn-of-the-century Russian Symbolist circles (Belyj and Blok) is not to be ignored, offers an insight into the theoretical background of Russian Sophiology. Following in the footsteps of Vl. Solovyev and referring to the Fathers of Church, Florensky considers it completely feasible to link Sophiology to living Christian theology and practice, offering denials against accusations of heresy. Utilising abundant interdisciplinary methods in his argumentation Florensky emphasises strife upon behalf of the self oriented towards the principle of self-perfection-a main trend also prophesied by his contemporary N. Berdjaev. Concepts of memory, dichotomies of darkness and light are given detailed discussion, from which, in harmony with Florensky's teachings, follows the transition from the empirical state of time and space to the higher realm of the Absolute. In this process dualism may be conquered by the interfering principle of the Holy Sophia (this interpretation modifies scanty clues found in Solovyev's oeuvre), who represents the principle of Unification. A novel differentiation provides distinction between Western Philosophy and Russian Sophiology by marking the historically corrupt Sophia in the former.

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editions of several Greek Patristic works. Gutenberg Jahrbuch LXXXVI. 2011 (megjelenés előtt). 50. Nikolopulos 1973 - Panayotis G. Nikolopulos: Αί ∊ις τόν Ίωάννην χρυσόστομον έσϕαλμένως άποδιδόμ

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