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Biologia Futura
Authors:
Esra Aciman Demirel
,
Mumin Alper Erdoğan
,
Bilge Piri Cinar
, and
Oytun Erbas

research. The purpose of this study was to show the convulsion-reducing effect of agomelatine, in both clinical and electrophysiological terms, in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced experimental epilepsy model in rats. Materials and

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In the present study the contribution of estradiol in sex-dependent differences of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures was investigated in rats. The rats were divided into four groups: 1) sham, 2) ovariectomized (OVX), 3) ovariectomized-estradiol (OVX-Est) and 4) male. The OVX-Est group received estradiol valerate (2 mg/kg; i.m/4 weeks) while, male, sham and OVX groups received vehicle. The animals were injected by PTZ (90 mg/kg). The latencies to minimal clonic seizures (MCS) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), were recorded. Serum 17β-estradiol and testosterone levels were also determined using an Elisa kit. GTCS latency in OVX rats was higher than in sham-operated animals (P < 0.05). MCS and GTCS latency in the male group was significantly higher than in the sham, OVX and OVX-Est groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in MCS or GTCS latencies among OVX-Est, sham and OVX groups. Serum 17β-estradiol level in the OVX group was significantly lower than in the sham (P < 0.01) and in the OVX-Est group it was higher than in the sham, OVX and male groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Serum testosterone level in the male group was significantly higher than in all the other three groups (P < 0.001). It seems that testosterone probably has a more efficient role than estradiol in the gender dependent difference in seizure caused by PTZ in rats.

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Some studies have shown a relationship between febrile seizures and zinc levels. The lowest dose zinc supplementation in pentylenetetrazole seizure model has a protective effect. But, zinc pretreatment has no effect in maximal electroshock model. However, it is unclear how zinc supplementation affects hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc supplementation on febrile seizures in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Zinc supplementation was commenced 5 days prior to febrile seizure induction by placing the animals in a water bath at 45°C. We measured the rectal temperature and determined the febrile seizure latency, duration, and stage. In the zinc-supplemented group, both the seizure latency and the rectal temperature triggering seizure initiation were significantly higher than in the other groups. We suggest that zinc supplementation can positively modulate febrile seizure pathogenesis in rats.

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