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Abstract  

A more globalized concept of culture and the tsunami of information made available by the digital revolution call for new reading practices. The emerging discipline of World Literature is an attempt to create such practice, but one that would seem to have very little place in it for the highly specialized skills that define philology, the closest of all close reading strategies. It is this tension that has sparked several calls for a “return to philology.” A historical overview of the Golden Age of classical philology in Germany (1777–1872) suggests that the skills that have defined the profession all over the globe from earliest times are still valuable, but in future can best be employed only in cooperation with scholars having other competencies.

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Texts are the most reliable bases for investigating language contacts. The field of research for philology is the analysis and semantic processing of texts. The present study deals with the effects of Hungarian terminology on Croatian judiciary terminology in the 15th century based on the original Latin book of law and its contemporary Hungarian and Croatian translations. The corpus in this research contains words borrowed from Hungarian as well as calques and semantic loans created on the basis of Hungarian patterns. In addition, the study analyzes various attitudes behind certain phrases.

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Philology is the servant of classical antiquity. And translation serves it by transposing it into another language. First translated into Latin (when originally written in Greek), later translated from Greek or Latin into the vernaculars, the works of the classical authors have reached modernity through the complex filter of philological interpretation and literary apprehension. P. Hummel analyzes the ways in which objectivity and subjectivity interact in the restitution of what is supposed to be the original and genuine meaning of the texts translated.

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Abstract  

A bibliometric survey of 28 scholars named in Poland as being the leading scholars in the fields of Linguistics and of English and American Studies shows that only five of them had done work which was cited more than once a year during the eleven years 1980 to 1990. The reasons are apparently not only the poverty of the libraries currently available in Poland but also the restricted selection of Polish journals represented in the citation indices. Suggestions are made as to how good scholarly work done in Poland could be made better known in the rest of the world.

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The world premiere recording of Bartók’s Violin Concerto, played by Zoltán Székely has been a classic for seventy-two years now. Since that time, dozens of artists have committed the work to disc and hundreds more—from concert artists to conservatory students—have played the Concerto. Székely’s extremely subtle, almost chamber-music-like interpretation has been widely admired but many violinists in past decades have favored, by and large, a more robust approach, one that stresses the work’s connections to the Romantic concerto tradition. The question is: can a careful reading of the musical text—the final version as well as the various manuscript sources—help a player make practical stylistic decisions? A comparative examination of the performance of the first 16 measures from a number of older and more recent recordings will be set against what textual analysis can tell us, as a test case for a productive dialog between scholarship and performance.

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Abstract  

To examine the dynamics of incompletion that characterizes many writings by twentieth century authors, the following essay investigates the possibilities to visualize (1) switches, (2) shuffles and (3) shifts in modern multilingual manuscripts with digital philological tools. (1) Jerome McGann’s notions of the bibliographical and the linguistic codes were originally not coined in relation to manuscript studies, but they can be applied to a particular form of “code switching” between an image-based and a text-based approach. (2) Another phenomenon that typically marks the writing process of literary texts is the practice of shuffling textual segments when their definitive position has not yet been fixed. (3) Finally, transtextual shifts in multilingual manuscripts are not only limited to intertextual references, but often have a language-related dimension as well.

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The aim of this work is to provide a possible definition for Renaissance antiquarianism. This cultural pathway, which influenced the way the past was interpreted between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries, represented a methodological perspective which involved the cross-referencing of heterogeneous sources, strongly linked to mankind’s perception of time and that helped shape a renewed historical consciousness. Focus will be devoted to a possible history of the phenomenon and a general explanation of its methodology.

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This paper is the first in what aims to be a series of papers toward a new decipherment and linguistic reconstruction of the Kitan Assembled Script Eulogy for Empress Xuanyi of 1101 A.D. In my treatment of this inscription, I have attempted to juxtapose the Kitan text and its very roughly corresponding Chinese text as much as possible, to allow for greater accuracy in decipherment and reconstruction. This methodology has allowed me to identify several words with previously unnoticed Mongolic cognates.

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This paper presents a new decipherment of the Langjun Inscription of 1134 A.D., including a significantly revised phonological reconstruction of the text, new readings of several graphemes, paleographical notes on certain Kitan and Chinese graphemes encountered in the text, and a glossary of words contained in the text including identifiable etyma. In terms of methodology, the Kitan and corresponding Chinese texts of this bilingual inscription are juxtaposed to facilitate decipherment and reconstruction. Although several important philological studies of this text exist, this article presents the first linguistic reconstruction of the inscription.

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This paper represents a long-needed criticism of Miller (2005) which carried over the famous discussion of Turkic böz ‘fabric’ in the micro-‘Altaic’ context even further East to Japan and Korea. I demonstrate that Miller’s arguments fail on historical linguistics and philological grounds for all five putative ‘Altaic’ families due in large extent to the faulty nature of either his argumentation or data, or both.

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