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Acta Agronomica Hungarica
Authors: É. Héthelyi, B. Galambosi, S. Szarka, É. Lemberkovics, and É. Szőke

Héthelyi, B. É., Galambosi, B. (2005): Phytochemical and pharmacological properties of Rhodiola rosea . 6th Int. Congress of the Worldwide Hungarian Medical Academy (WHMA), Budapest, August 26–27, 2005. Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest

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Artemisia herba-alba (Asso) and Artemisia monosperma (Delile) essential oils were tested against three sucking insect pests under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. These pests included Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), Aphis gossypii (Glover) and Thrips tabaci (Lindman). Laboratory results showed that the LC50 of A. herba-alba and A. monosperma were 0.042, 0.075% for eggs and 0.074, 0.186% for immature stages of B. tabaci. Also, both oils gave a high toxicity on A. gossypii with LC50 0.023 and 0.085%. Artemisia herba-alba and A. monosperma were more toxic on T. tabaci and A. gossypii than B. tabaci in the laboratory test. In contrast T. tabaci was sensitive for both oils (LC50 0.038 and 0.011%). These oils were efficient for controlling tested insects on cucumber plants at greenhouses. This treatment caused 85.97, 82.17% reduction in the population of B. tabaci, 90.44, 87.99% for Aphis gossypii and 87.26, 84.99% for T. tabaci. Chemical analysis of A. herba-alba and A. monosperma oils detected the presence of hydrocarbon terpenes, oxygenated terpenes, hydrocarbon sesquiterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes represented about 16.38%, 58.91%, 21.61%, 2.74% and 21.53%, 57.17%, 19.32%, 1.70%, of the oil content, respectively.

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.P. , Fotsis , T. & Gerothanassis , E.B. ( 2009 ): Phytochemicals in olive-leaf extract and their antiproliferative activity against cancer and endothelial cells . Mol. Nutr. Food Res. , 53 , 600 – 608

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. Talukdar , S. N. , Hossain , M. N. ( 2014 ) Phytochemical, phytotherapeutical and pharmacological study of Momordica dioica . Evid. Based Complement. Alternat. Med. 2014 , 806082 . 23

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Orsolya Orbán-Gyapai, Peter Forgo, Judit Hohmann, and Andrea Vasas

. Litvinenko , Y. A. , Muzychkina , R. A. ( 2003 ) Phytochemical investigation of biologically active substances in certain Kazakhstan Rumex species. 1 . Chem. Nat. Comp. 39 , 446 – 449 . 9

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prepared at the concentrations of 1.0 mg/mL in a methanol solution. The extract and standard solutions were then diluted 20-fold for LC–MS analysis. Finally, these solutions were stored at –20 °C until HPLC–DAD–ESI–MS/MS analysis. Phytochemical analysis by

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: E. Ivanišová, K. Meňhartová, M. Terentjeva, L. Godočíková, J. Árvay, and M. Kačániová

The aim of the present study was to determine the microbial composition, antioxidant activity, and content of phytochemicals in prepared kombucha tea beverage. Microbiota was identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, antioxidant activity of beverage was tested by ABTS and phosphomolybdenum method, the total content of phytochemicals (polyphenols, flavonoids, and phenolic acids) was measured by colorimetric methods. The major phenolic acids, flavonoids, and methylxanthines were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Candida krusei, Sphingomonas melonis, Sphingomonas aquatilis, Brevibacillus centrosporus, and Gluconobacter oxydans were the most abundant microorganisms. Antioxidant activity of kombucha tested by ABTS and phosphomolybdenum method was 1.16 mg TEAC/ml and 2.04 mg TEAC/ml, respectively, which values were higher than in black tea 0.67 and 0.81 mg TEAC/ml, respectively. Also, content of total polyphenols (0.42 mg GAE/ ml), flavonoids (0.13 mg QE/ml), and phenolic acids (0.19 mg CAE/ml) was higher in kombucha than in black tea (0.18 mg GAE/ml; 0.02 mg QE/ml; 0.05 mg CAE/ml, respectively). Gallic, chlorogenic, syringic, and protocatechuic acids, and rutin and vitexin from flavonoids were dominant in kombucha beverage detected by HPLC. Strong difference in caffeine contents, 217.81 µg ml−1 (black tea) and 100.72 µg ml−1 (kombucha beverage), was observed. The amounts of theobromine were similar in black tea and kombucha, but theophylline was detected only in black tea in trace amount (0.52 µg ml−1).

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Inula cappa (family Compositae) is used in the Ayurvedic medicinal system for the treatment of bronchitis, diabetes, fever, hypertension, and rheumatism. The proposed high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) study offers coherent evaluation of isoalantolactone, germacranolide, β-sitosterol, and lupeol from I. cappa root. Methanolic solutions of isoalantolactone, germacranolide, β-sitosterol, and lupeol were applied on an HPTLC plate and they were scanned at 525 nm. The mobile phase toluene—methanol (9.4:0.6, v/v) was used for all the phytochemicals. After development, all the plates were air-dried at room temperature, derivatized with anisaldehyde–sulfuric acid reagent and heated at 105°C. This study aids the identification of these compounds and provides an easy and simple method for the simultaneous estimation of these markers in the I. cappa roots. The method would serve as an expedient tool in routine analyses to corroborate the drug through good constancy.

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Adom, K.K., Sorrells, M.E., Liu, R.H. 2003. Phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity of wheat varieties. J. Agric. Food Chem. 51 :7825–7834. Liu R.H. Phytochemical profiles

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chili pepper. Besides that, the presented preliminary study clearly showed that both roasted coffee and ground chili pepper are sources of compounds with multidirectional antioxidant properties. Additionally, phytochemicals from used spice possessed

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