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: Jacobsen , Knut A. (ed.): Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism . Volume 1. Regions, Pilgrimage, Deities . Leiden , Brill , pp. 741 – 754 . Bowles , Adam

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In the decades since the change of political system, religious culture in Hungary has undergone substantial transformation, mainly due to the fact that the way has been opened for ideological pluralism. However, not only have new religious phenomena appeared as a consequence, there has also been considerable change in the vernacular religiosity of large numbers. All these changes can be clearly observed in the forms of new religious spaces, their symbols and rites. The aim of the present study is to analyse the changes in religious culture and the motivations behind them through the example of two new places of pilgrimage.

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Different levels of meeting (with other participants, with other cultures, with art, with oneself, with nature or God) and the sense of community are essential experiences during a pilgrimage. The following text deals with the meaning and functions of pilgrimage rituals concerning community and team spirit. What part does the performing dimension of symbolic acting play and how does the ritual intention differ from the intention of everyday acting? The recent attraction of pilgrimage goes back also to a growing longing for rituals and tradition enabling people to leave the everyday life in a limited, well structured and most of all repeatable way.

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()[Hungarian Jewish pilgrimage book]. Budapest: Chábád Lubávics Zsidó Nevelési és Oktatási Egyesület. UJVÁRI, Péter (ed.) 2000: Magyar zsidó lexicon [Hungarian Jewish lexicon]. Budapest: Makkabi. Magyar zsidó lexicon

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Bálint , Sándor - Barna , Gábor 1994: Búcsújáró magyarok [Hungarians on Pilgrimage]. Budapest: Szent István Társulat. Barna G. Búcsújáró magyarok 1994

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Summary

Egeria, a 4th century pious woman from the south of present-day Spain, retold, after visiting Palestine with the Bible in hand, her observations to her sisters. If the linguistic aspects of her letters are quite well-known, much less is known about its stylistic value, inappropriately called “simple”.

What seems to be boringly the same again and again, is in fact a constantly renewed and perfectly mastered “variation on a theme”, just as in a well-composed piece of music. Her apparent objectivity is indeed a wish to focus on what she considers the most important, namely to tell her community, as closely to reality as possible, what she observed during her pilgrimage. However, Egeria’s latin is also a testimony of the christian lexicon in construction and of the social changes that were in progress by that time.

Linguistics and stylistics work together here, the choice of a word or a grammatical formula reveals hidden information about the proper style of an author who, despite her supposed objectivity, had real personal purposes.

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, Gabriele 2003: “Vessel-Rituality” — Cselekmény és élmény a jelenkori zarándoklatokon [Action and experience in Contemporary Pilgrimages], in: Brunner , Walter — Eberhardt , Helmut — Fazekas , István — Gálffy , Zsuzsanna — Hammer-Luca , Elke — Hegedűs

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The sacred space of a place of pilgrimage and its objects: Mariaradna . From the turn of the 17th to the 18th century Máriaradna was a place of pilgrimage for the Catholic inhabitants (Hungarians, Germans, Bulgarians and others) in a vast region of South-east Hungary. Since the First World War the area of its attraction has belonged to the territory of three countries, Hungary, Romania and Serbia. In the second half of the 19th century and before the First World War the people of settlements visiting the place of pilgrimage erected chapels, columns with sacred images, stations of the cross and statues on the hillside behind the church using concrete, a modern building material at that time. The article examines these structures. They clearly reflect the strong Franciscan influence (Saint Francis, Saint Anthony, Saint Elizabeth of Hungary), as well as the devotional trends of the previous century (Sacred Heart, Heart of Mary, Virgin Mother of Lourdes) in the religious practice of the region.

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The paper (originally a chapter in a book published in Hungary, extensively investigating into the system of intertexts of Turgenev's novel, Rudin - cf. Budapest, 2002) raises the problem of the intertextual poetics of Turgenev's prose fiction as represented in his novel, Rudin. As elements of the intertextual system of this novel, on the one hand, Griboedov's comedy, Gore ot uma, on the other hand, Pushkin's novel, Evgenij Onegin are examined in detail from the specific point of view of how these literary works are creatively built into the semantic world of the Turgenevian text in a way that their joint presence there as an intertextual complex sheds light on the complicated poetic interrelation of these two texts themselves (interpreted in the contexts of the history of the text evolution and from the perspective of poetic meaning formation within the semantic universe). It is the motif of travelling (metaphorically construed as pilgrimage) which stands at centre stage in the analysis. The spatial dimensions of Chackij's figure as opposed to the dominance of the temporal semantic extensions of Sofia's poetic figure are under scrutiny as a crucial motivation factor for the plot construction. In the process of analysis the motif as belonging to the plot and the motif as representing a more abstract semantic unit with independent poetic development are consistently differentiated and also the semantic status of the pretext is separated from that of the intertext.

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. 7 Gammon S. Secular pilgrimage and sport tourism. In: Brent WR, Daryl A. (eds.) Sport tourism: Interrelationships, impacts and issues. Channel View Publications, Clevedon, 2004; pp. 30

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