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The mechanically transmitted haemoflagellate,Trypanosoma evansicauses 'surra', a wasting disease of domestic animals and is highly endemic in distribution in Southeast Asia. The detection ofT. evansiis important for improving the epizootiological and animal health status of the region. The specificity and sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using oligonucleotide primers constructed fromT. evansirepetitive DNA sequences were studied in the present investigation. Using the assay, it was possible to amplify template DNA ofT. evansiderived from buffaloes, camels and horses to a threshold sensitivity level of 0.5 pg and to detect DNA from as few as five organisms in 10 (l crude blood samples. Following experimental infection of calves with 5 × 105T. evansi, positive signals could be observed as early as 12 h post-infection. DNAs from two common haemoflagellates of cattle,Babesia bigeminaandTheileria annulatawere not amplified with the primers.

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Biksi, I., Kacskovics, I., Mándoki, M., Iván, J., Horváth-Papp, I., Makay, G. and Vetési, F. (1998): Detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in Hungarian swine herds by polymerase chain reaction. Acta Vet. Hung

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. 77 952 Hu, J. S., Wang, M., Sether, D., Xie, W. and Leonhard, K. W. (1996): Use of polymerase chain reaction to study transmission of banana bunchy top virus by

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Glare EM, Patton JC, Premier RR, Lawrence AJ, Nisbett IT: Analysis of a repetitive DNA sequence from Bordetella pertussis and its application to the diagnosis of pertussis using the polymerase chain reaction. J Clin Microbiol 28, 1982–1987 (1990

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. A. and Straus, N. (1993): Rapid identification of bacteria on the basis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified ribosomal DNA spacer polymorphism. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 59, 945952. Rapid identification of bacteria on the

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Carvalho, R., Oliveira, A. M., Souza, A. M., Passos, L. M. F. and Martins, A. S. (2000): Prevalence of equine herpesvirus type 1 latency detected by polymerase chain reaction. Arch. Virol. 145 , 1773-1787. Prevalence of equine

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Luis Francisco Sánchez-Anguiano, Nadia Velázquez-Hernández, Fernando Martín Guerra-Infante, Marisela Aguilar-Durán, Alma Rosa Pérez-Álamos, Sergio Estrada-Martínez, José Antonio Navarrete-Flores, Ada Agustina Sandoval-Carrillo, Elizabeth Irasema Antuna-Salcido, Jesús Hernández-Tinoco and Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel

northern Mexican states, prevalence between 12.4% and 16.6% were found in female sex workers [ 16 – 17 ]. In the present study, by using a different study design (case–control) and laboratory method (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) compared to those used

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to antibiotics. Additionally, the definition is necessary to enable the collection of epidemiological data. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) method and DNA sequence analysis method were used to

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Urushibar, N., Kwon, K. W., Takahashi, T. A., Sekiguchi, S.: HCMV DNA is not detectable with nested double polymerase chain reaction in healthy blood donors. Vox Sang 68 , 9 (1995). HCMV DNA is not detectable with nested double

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In this study, bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) was detected and biotypically characterised in clinical samples using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The RT-PCR technique produced two different amplicons (402 and approx. 680 bp in size) in case of the presence of both biotypes (cp and ncp) in the sample. The mixture of the biotypes as detected by RT-PCR was verified by the immunoplaque assay (IPA). Purification of biotypes was carried out by native plaque isolation and subsequent RT-PCR revealed single products (402 or approx. 680 bp in size) in each clone. The results showed that RT-PCR can be used for accurate molecular differentiation between the BVDV biotypes.

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