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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Zhao Namula, Yoko Sato, Manita Wittayarat, Quynh Anh Le, Nhien Thi Nguyen, Qingyi Lin, Maki Hirata, Fuminori Tanihara, and Takeshige Otoi

beneficial effects and improved the production system of porcine embryos. Curcumin, a common dietary pigment and spice, is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent extracted from turmeric ( Curcuma longa ), and is known to play an essential role

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Clara Malo, Lydia Gil, Rafael Cano, Felisa Martinez, and Noelia Gonzalez

In an effort to improve the quality of in vitro produced porcine embryos, the effect of progestagens — progesterone analogues — on the in vitro developmental competence of porcine oocytes was studied. A total of 1421 in vitro matured oocytes, from 4 replicates, were inseminated with frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Progestagens were added to late maturation and embryo cultures (10 IU/ml). Fertilisation success (pre-maturation, penetration, monospermy and efficiency) and nuclear maturation were evaluated. There were no differences among prematuration rates between groups (P = 0.221). Penetration rates were higher (P < 0.001) in the presence of progestagens (75.0%) as compared to the control (51.7%). However, no differences were observed in monospermy percentages (P = 0.246). The results indicated that supplementation with progestagens increased the efficiency of the in vitro fertilisation system (P < 0.001). An additional beneficial effect was observed in nuclear maturation with progestagens (P = 0.035). In summary, progestagen supplementation is an important factor to improve the in vitro fertilisation procedure.

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The worldwide occurrence and re-occurrence of transboundary diseases like foot-and-mouth disease or classical swine fever indicates that there is a high need for the development of powerful, robust and high-capacity new diagnostic methods, which are able to detect the causative agents before they could spread to large populations and cause tremendous losses. This article reports the experiences of a research group on the development of molecular methods for the improved diagnosis of a range of porcine viral diseases, including diseases on List A of the Office International des Epizooties (OIE). Nucleic acid hybridisation and various polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays have been applied for routine diagnosis of a large range of viral diseases. During the last one-and-a-half decade more than 40 nested PCR assays have been developed to detect a variety of DNA and RNA viruses. False positive and negative results are avoided by the use of special tools, practices and internal controls of amplification (mimics). Recently, real-time PCR methods (TaqMan, molecular beacons, Primer-Probe Energy Transfer system) have been developed for the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease, swine vesicular disease and vesicular stomatitis. Multiplex PCR packages have been developed for the simultaneous detection of eight important viruses of swine. By introducing nucleic acid extraction and pipetting robotics, together with the multi-channel real-time PCR machines, the diagnostic procedures have become rapid, robust and automated. In order to standardise the real-time PCR assays, the rules of OIE are considered. By following the five steps of OIE standardisation and validation, the new diagnostic procedures are nationally and internationally standardised and harmonised. The rapid, powerful and internationally standardised molecular diagnosis contributes to the reduction of losses caused by the transboundary viral diseases in swine populations.

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. , Enjuanes , L. and Pensaert , M. ( 1996 ): An adenovirus recombinant expressing the spike glycoprotein of porcine respiratory coronavirus is immunogenic in swine . J. Gen. Virol. 77 , 309 – 313

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Meikle, C. S. M. (2001): Detection of Pasteurella multocida in pigs with porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome. Xth International Symposium of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians and OIE Seminar on Biotechnology. Salsomaggiore, Parma, Italy, 4

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Ádám Bálint, István Kiss, Krisztián Bányai, Imre Biksi, Katalin Szentpáli-Gavallér, Tibor Magyar, István Jankovics, Mónika Rózsa, Bálint Szalai, Mária Takács, Ádám Tóth, and Ádám Dán

In 2010, two novel porcine H1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs with influenza-like illness in Hungarian swine herds. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed that they shared molecular features with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains, which emerged globally during 2009. The PB2, HA and NA genes contained unique amino acid changes compared to the available new H1N1 influenza virus sequences of pig origin. Furthermore, the investigated strains could be separated with respect to parallel amino acid substitutions affecting the polymerase genes (PB2, PB1 and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) gene, supporting the proposed complementarities between these proteins, all required for the viral fitness. Molecular characterisation of two Hungarian human pandemic H1N1 isolates was also performed, so that we could compare contemporaneous strains of different host species origins. Shared molecular motifs in various genes of animal and human influenza strains suggested that the Hungarian porcine strains could have originated from humans through direct interspecies transmission. This study is among the few that support the natural human-to-pig transmission of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

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): Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) enteric disease: an independent condition or part of the systemic disease? Vet . Microbiol. 176 , 83 – 87 . Bianco , C. , Felice , V. , Panarese , S

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the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROSs) and strengthen the integrity of the monolayer of porcine non-tumourigenic IPEC-J2 cells. As indicated by Chen et al. (2018) , Que protects IPEC-J2 cells from oxidation-induced apoptosis in 16

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Miklós Pál Dunay, Zsuzsanna Lipcsey, Attila Arany-Tóth, Tibor Németh, Norbert Solymosi, László Venczel, Enikő Nagy, and József Pap-Szekeres

arterial and venous ligation in a porcine model . J. Urol. 169 , 697 – 700 . 10.1016/S0022-5347(05)63995-X Milsom , J. , Trencheva , K. , Monette , S. , Pavoor , R. , Shukla , P. , Ma , J. and Toyoki , S. ( 2012 ): Evaluation of the

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-extraction steps such as filtering, drying, and crushing ( Boran and Regenstein, 2010 ). Gelatine is generally produced from skin or hides and bones of porcine and bovine, while over half of the global gelatine production comes directly from porcine. Due

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