Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 80 items for :

  • "post-harvest" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Summary  

Sweet pepper is susceptible to relatively fast quality changes and its quality is influenced strongly by water or mass losses mainly due to transpiration processes during post-harvest. The aim of this study was the investigation of different storage conditions' effect on quality maintenance of pepper using surface thermal imaging, measurement of overall static stiffness and low-mass impact stiffness as non-destructive methods. Post-harvest keeping quality of pepper samples increased and unfavourable quality degradation was prevented under low, non-chilling temperatures together with the use of LDPE-packaging film resulted in high quality and fresh appearance after more than two weeks long storage period.

Restricted access

Mucor piriformis, Gilbertella persicaria and the members of the Rhizopus genus (especially R. stolonifer and R. oryzae) are the most important agents of post-harvest decay among the fungi belonging in the order Mucorales (Zygomycetes). Epidemiological studies and control of post-harvest losses require reproducible methods with which to distinguish and characterize the isolates. This review summarizes the available information regarding the genetic and physiological variability, strain typing and taxonomy of this fungal group.

Restricted access

Cut flowers of Dianthus caryophyllus L. cv. Asso were treated with 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate (8-HQS) at 200 and 400 ppm with or without sucrose at 50 g l-1, silver thiosulphate (STS) at 0.2 and 0.4 mM with or without sucrose at 50 g l-1,and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) at 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 g m-3 for 6 h to study the effect of these chemicals on post-harvest quality. 8-HQS treatments increased the vase life and the percentage loss of initial fresh weight compared to the control. In addition, the vase life was longer when sucrose was applied in combination with 8-HQS. The best treatment involved 400 ppm 8-HQS + 50 g l-1 sucrose. All the concentrations of STS prolonged the vase life and fresh mass compared to the control. The best treatment was STS at 0.4 mM with or without sucrose. All levels of 1-MCP prolonged the vase life and increased the fresh weight in comparison with the control. The best treatment in this respect was 1-MCP at 0.5 g m-3 for 6 h. The chlorophyll content (chl a and chl b) in the leaves was higher than the control in the best treatment of each chemical.

Restricted access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
C. Cano-Molina
,
A. López-Fernández
,
N. Díaz-González
,
R. González-Barrio
,
N. Baenas
,
M.J. Periago
, and
F.J. García-Alonso

, leaving room for further biosynthesis of bioactive compounds. Various strategies have been developed to increase the concentration of bioactive compounds during post-harvest storage. Among them, artificial lighting treatments using ultraviolet light (UV

Open access

This investigation was carried out to study the effect of 100, 200 and 300 ppm 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate (8-HQS) and 5 and 10% sucrose treatments on the vase life and post-harvest quality of cut flowers of Strelitzia reginae Ait. and Hippeastrum vittatum Herb. cv. Apple Blossome. All possible combinations of 8-HQS and sucrose were tested. The treatments were applied as holding solutions, and control flowers were held in distilled water till the end of the experiment. All the treatments significantly increased the vase life and number of open florets of Strelitzia reginae cut flowers compared to the control. Applying 8-HQS and sucrose treatments in both seasons improved the vase life and floret longevity of Hippeastrum vittatum cut flowers. In addition, the percentage of fresh weight gain from the initial weight and the carbohydrate content were also enhanced in both cut flower crops. In order to obtain the highest post-harvest quality of Strelitzia reginae Ait. and Hippeastrum vittatum Herb. cv. Apple Blossome cut flowers, treatment with 200 ppm 8-HQS + 10% sucrose was recommended.

Restricted access
Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Authors:
Mai Sao Dam
,
Vuong Duc Nguyen
,
Tamás Zsom
,
Lien Le Phuong Nguyen
, and
Géza Hitka

Abstract

The effect of storage temperature and ozone treatment on the post-harvest quality of cucumber and tomato was investigated. Cucumber and tomato were stored together with or without gaseous ozone treatment at 20 °C and 14 °C for 16 days. Firmness, color, weight loss, DA index and decay percentage of samples were evaluated during storage period. The results showed that the combination of ozone treatment and cold storage could maintain the quality of these horticultural products and decreased the decay incidence. Additionally, this combination also reduced the weight loss of samples during storage. Furthermore, ozone treatment maintained the green skin color of cucumber. No sign of chilling injury occurred during storage at 14 °C. Commodities stored with approximately 0.1 ppm gaseous ozone at 14 °C retained the firmness compared to other treatments until the end of the experiment. This study suggests a promising use of gaseous ozone treatment in storage chamber where ethylene-producing and ethylene-sensitive vegetables are stored together.

Open access

A field experiment using various levels of phosphorus, farmyard manure (FYM) and biofertilizers was undertaken at Udaipur during 2001–02 and 2002–03 to observe the direct effect of the treatments on the yield and micronutrient uptake of soybean and their residual effect on the yield and micronutrient utilization of a subsequent wheat crop. The results revealed that the seed/grain yield of soybean and wheat significantly increased with the application of increasing levels of P, FYM and biofertilizers. The integrated use of P, FYM and biofertilizers was able to replace 20 kg P 2 O 5 ha −1 to soybean and 10 kg P 2 O 5 ha −1 to wheat.The application of increasing levels of P, FYM and biofertilizers significantly enhanced the uptake of Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe by soybean and wheat. Among the biofertilizers, dual inoculation with phosphate-solubilising bacteria (PSB) + vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) gave the best performance. The integrated use of P levels and biofertilizers significantly improved the Zn and Fe uptake of soybean. The highest Zn and Fe uptake (125.77 mg kg −1 and 562.03 mg kg −1 , respectively) was recorded with the combined use of 40 kg P 2 O 5 ha −1 + dual inoculation. The application of FYM and P levels resulted in a significant improvement in the organic carbon, CEC, available N and P, porosity and hydraulic conductivity of the soil after the wheat harvest. Among the biofertilizers, dual inoculation led to maximum soil-available P. Phosphorus application gave a significant decrease in the DTPA-extractable Zn and Fe content of the soil after the harvest of wheat. FYM application significantly enhanced the DTPA-extractable Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe contents of the soil.

Restricted access

Abstract

A number of methods have been applied to measure total antioxidant capacity (TAC), including FRAP, which is based on reducing the amount of iron ions in a complex compound. Researchers often use measurement of absorbance 10 min after mixing a sample with the FRAP reaction solution to calculate TAC. The FRAP solution has been shown to alter absorbance over time by ca 0.0010–0.0020 per hour, under storage conditions. This article intends to show that some substances do not fully or sufficiently react within the common analysis period. It is evident from the results that some substances react more quickly and others very slowly. Absorbance in relation to various phenols was measured. Compared to the levels of absorbance at 10 min, mean absorbance at 48 h was higher by 5,395% for vanillin, 426% for caffeic acid, 170% for sinapinic acid, 67% for gallic acid, 19% for syringic acid, and only by 4% for Trolox. Results for vanillin and caffeic acid indicate potential auto-catalysis.

Open access

Lactic acid fermentation of carrot as a method of preservation using different lactic acid bacteria, viz. Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus cerevisiae and Streptococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis as such and in sequence at different temperatures and with varying salt content (2, 2.5 and 3%) were employed in the fermentation of carrot. The differences in fermentation behaviour of different microorganisms were quite contrasting at 26 °C, but the sequential culture started deviating from the very first day and acidity increased up to 6 days. A temperature of 26 °C and salt concentration of 2.5% were the best for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) fermentation of Asiatic carrot as highest acidity (1.40% lactic acid), low pH and low reducing sugars were achieved in sequential fermentation. The LAB count of 7.8×10 8 CFU ml −1 was also higher at these concentrations coupled with higher sensory scores of the products. Among the fermentation types tried, sequential culture fermentation of the vegetables produced the product with higher acidity, low pH and reducing sugars. The sequential culture fermentation imparted the fermented products better flavour, texture and taste than other products fermented naturally or with lactic cultures of Pediococcus cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum and Streptococcus lactis in single separate fermentation. Based on the overall and sensory quality evaluation, the fermented carrot product prepared with sequential culture was the best followed by the product prepared using natural microflora.

Restricted access