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Abstract  

After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, Mexico imported from an European country 28,000 tons of contaminated powder milk with the fission product 137Cs. When the contamination was detected, the alarm among the authorities and population spread out very quickly and of course the product was retired at once from the foodstuff market. Nevertheless, the public panic grew up in such a manner, that even the way to manage and to dispose safely this material, considered highly dangerous, was largely discussed. Now, about two decades ago from this event, a study has been performed to compare the level of radioactivity due to both radioisotopes present in one saved sample: the artificial contaminant 137Cs, beside the natural, all around present 40K, in order to evaluate in a more realistic way how risky was the management, possible consumption, and final disposition of this nourishment. This paper considers results obtained within an uncertainty degree equal to ±5%, and set up conclusions by comparing artificial and natural radioactivity present in that contaminated powder milk.

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Comparative studies on some analytical methods

Thermal decomposition of powder milk

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: R. Macêdo, O. de Moura, A. de Souza, and A. Macêdo

Abstract  

This work present comparative results on powder milk storage quality, obtained from analytical methods. Protein content was determined conventional (Kjeldahl) and colorimetric with biuret reagent at 540 nm and integral quality by thermogravimetric and biological methods. A method was developed for the protein separation of powder milk. Powder milk was submitted to degradation processes at 45, 60 and 80°C for 20 days. The results indicated that protein content values were inconsistent if determinations by Kjeldahl and colorimetric methods and biological tests were compared. There is evidence of thermal decomposition of powder milk as detected by biological and thermogravimetric methods.

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Abstract  

Seven trace elements were determined in milk formulas, powder milk and infant food. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for the analysis of Fe, Zn, Co, Cr and Rb, while As and Cu content was determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Differences were found in the trace element content of foods of the same type. Milk formulas are comparable with human milk according to the results obtained for the elements analyzed. The samples of powder cow's milk presented similar concentrations of the elements studied. Liver with vegetables was found to have the highest Cu content. A meal prepared at home, made of beef and fresh vegetables showed a higher trace element content than its similar commercial one. An estimation of the daily intake of the elements analyzed was made and compared with minimum recommended daily ingestion.

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Vitamin B6 analysis by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and its validation in milk powder prompted this study. The calibration curves for pyridoxal, pyridoxamine and pyridoxine were evaluated and method precision and accuracy assessed. It was found that the working range was adequate for all the analytes. The analytical procedure was verified by testing the enzymatic efficiency, precision and accuracy. In milk powder samples pyridoxine was the only vitamer found in quantities above the considered limit of quantification and the accuracy showed Z-scores lower than 2. Uncertainty estimation based on method validation results was 0.066 mg/100g, for a vitamin B6 content of 0.61 mg/100 g. It was concluded that the method is adequate for vitamin B6 quantification in powder milk.

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( 2001 ) “ Health and Nutrition Properties of Probiotics in Food including Powder Milk with Live Lactic Acid Bacteria ” a Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on Evaluation of Health and Nutritional Properties of Probiotics in Food including

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, 322 – 328 . FAO/WHO ( 2001 ): Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on evaluation of health and nutrition properties of probiotics in food including powder milk with live lactic acid bacteria . Cordoba

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): Evaluation of health and nutritional properties of probiotics in food including powder milk with live lactic acid bacteria: Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation (Online). (Accessed 10 July 2012). Available at: http

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/WHO (2001): Evaluation of health and nutritional properties of probiotics in food including powder milk with live lactic acid bacteria: Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation, Córdoba , 2001. 34 p. [Internet document] URL ftp

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/2007000/articles/10369-en.pdf. FAO/WHO (2001): Health and nutritional properties of probiotics in food including powder milk with live lactic acid bacteria. Cited on 2008 16 Apr. Available from: http://209.85.175.104/search

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used to study any chemical changes occurring in a processed powder. The objective of this study was to analyze the phase transitions of ingredients and their influence on the thermokinetic properties of powder milk baby formulas using DSC as

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