Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 256 items for :

  • "problem gambling" x
Clear All

J. Sareen M. W. Enns 2010 Demographic and social variables associated with problem gambling among men and women in Canada

Open access

Disordered (pathological or problem) gambling and Axis 1 psychiatric disorders: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions American Journal of Epidemiology 173

Open access

; Taylor, Bagby, & Parker, 1997 ). Alexithymia and problem gambling have been shown to be associated in a number of studies. For example, Lumley and Roby ( 1995 ) found in a sample of adolescent problem gamblers, 31.4% were alexithymic compared with only 11

Open access

The Canadian problem gambling index: Final report Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Ottawa . J. Grant S

Open access

Introduction Problem gambling has been defined as gambling behavior that creates negative consequences for the gambler, others in his or her social network, or for the community ( Ferris & Wynne, 2001 ). The public stigma

Open access

encouraged public health workers to study the epidemiology of this behavior as they provide information about the incidence of problem gambling and the potential effectiveness of policies implemented to mitigate gambling’s harm ( Williams et al., 2012

Open access

). In line with these features, scratch card gambling was found to predict problem gambling severity over and above demographic variables, whereas participation in traditional lottery draws was not ( Short et al., 2015 ). Previous research has

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Rachel L. Sanacora, Seth W. Whiting, Corey E. Pilver, Rani A. Hoff and Marc N. Potenza

disorders, suggesting complex contributions to negative outcomes associated with PPG. Multiple levels of problem-gambling severity (including low-risk, at-risk, and PPG) are associated with elevated rates of both Axis-I and Axis-II DSM-IV psychiatric

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Victoria Manning, Nicki. A. Dowling, Stuart Lee, Simone Rodda, Joshua Benjamin Bernard Garfield, Rachel Volberg, Jayashri Kulkarni and Dan Ian Lubman

the past year, with 0.8% identified as problem gamblers (PGs), 2.8% as moderate-risk gamblers, 8.9% as low-risk gamblers, and 57.6% as non-PGs ( Hare, 2015 ). Systematic reviews of epidemiological research, predominantly from the USA, have

Open access

gambling as a public health issue ( Volberg, Gupta, Griffiths, Olason, & Delfabbro, 2010 ). A recent review of worldwide research showed a high prevalence of both participation in gambling ( Delfabbro, King, & Derevensky, 2016 ) and problem gambling

Open access