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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Olatz Lopez-Fernandez, Daria J. Kuss, Lucia Romo, Yannick Morvan, Laurence Kern, Pierluigi Graziani, Amélie Rousseau, Hans-Jürgen Rumpf, Anja Bischof, Ann-Kathrin Gässler, Adriano Schimmenti, Alessia Passanisi, Niko Männikkö, Maria Kääriänen, Zsolt Demetrovics, Orsolya Király, Mariano Chóliz, Juan José Zacarés, Emilia Serra, Mark D. Griffiths, Halley M. Pontes, Bernadeta Lelonek-Kuleta, Joanna Chwaszcz, Daniele Zullino, Lucien Rochat, Sophia Achab and Joël Billieux

led several scholars to coin the term “Problematic Mobile Phone Use” (PMPU) in the mid-2000s to describe the inability to regulate one’s use of the mobile phone, which is associated with negative consequences in daily life ( Bianchi & Phillips, 2005

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Olatz Lopez-Fernandez, Niko Männikkö, Maria Kääriäinen, Mark D. Griffiths and Daria J. Kuss

problematic mobile phone use (PMPU) in Belgian and Finnish smartphone users, because these two countries had not been studied before in such a context ( Deloitte, 2015 ), despite having a couple of the highest prevalence rates in mobile phone technology usage

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Tzu Tsun Luk, Man Ping Wang, Chen Shen, Alice Wan, Pui Hing Chau, John Oliffe, Kasisomayajula Viswanath, Sophia Siu-chee Chan and Tai Hing Lam

 al., 2013 ). Alternative measures of PSU include Smartphone Addiction Inventory ( Lin et al., 2014 ), Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale ( Kim, Lee, Lee, Nam, & Chung, 2014 ), Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire – Revised ( Kuss, Harkin, Kanjo

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Davide Marengo, Cornelia Sindermann, Daniela Häckel, Michele Settanni, Jon D. Elhai and Christian Montag

Billieux's framework on problematic mobile phone use. The I-PACE model by Brand, Young, Laier, Wölfling, and Potenza (2016) posits that individual differences in IUD may be the result of a complex interaction of person, affect, cognition, and execution

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Abstract

Background and aims

Likening mobile phone use dependency to the classification of excessive behaviors may be necessarily equivalent in seriousness to previously established addictions such as problematic computing or excessive gambling. The aim of the study explores into the behavior of excessive use of mobile phones as a pathological behavior.

Methods

Two studies investigated criteria for problematic mobile phone usage by examining student (Study 1, N = 301) and nonstudent (Study 2, N = 362) responses to a set of adapted mobile phone addiction inventories. Study 1 investigated cell phone addiction inventories as constructs designed to measure problematic cell phone use. Additionally, Study 2 sought to predict age, depression, extraversion, emotional stability, impulse control, and self-esteem as independent variables that augment respondents' perceptions of problematic use.

Results

The results from Study 1 and Study 2 indicate that 10 to 25% of the participants tested exhibited problematic cell phone usage. Additionally, age, depression, extraversion, and low impulse control are the most suitable predictors for problematic use.

Conclusions

The results of the two studies indicate that problematic mobile phone use does occur and ought to be taken seriously by the psychological community. Presently, there is limited data providing conclusive evidence for a comprehensible categorization of cell phone addiction, as well as a unified explanatory model specific to problematic mobile phone use. Studies such as this one may contribute substantial findings, adding scientific significance, and offering a valuable submission for the ongoing progress of creating intervention frameworks relative to “virtual addictions”.

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Background and aims

Research examining problematic mobile phone use has increased markedly over the past 5 years and has been related to “no mobile phone phobia” (so-called nomophobia). The 20-item Nomophobia Questionnaire (NMP-Q) is the only instrument that assesses nomophobia with an underlying theoretical structure and robust psychometric testing. This study aimed to confirm the construct validity of the Persian NMP-Q using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) models.

Methods

After ensuring the linguistic validity, Rasch models were used to examine the unidimensionality of each Persian NMP-Q factor among 3,216 Iranian adolescents and CFAs were used to confirm its four-factor structure. Differential item functioning (DIF) and multigroup CFA were used to examine whether males and females interpreted the NMP-Q similarly, including item content and NMP-Q structure.

Results

Each factor was unidimensional according to the Rach findings, and the four-factor structure was supported by CFA. Two items did not quite fit the Rasch models (Item 14: “I would be nervous because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me;” Item 9: “If I could not check my smartphone for a while, I would feel a desire to check it”). No DIF items were found across gender and measurement invariance was supported in multigroup CFA across gender.

Conclusions

Due to the satisfactory psychometric properties, it is concluded that the Persian NMP-Q can be used to assess nomophobia among adolescents. Moreover, NMP-Q users may compare its scores between genders in the knowledge that there are no score differences contributed by different understandings of NMP-Q items.

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“almost constantly” online due to the popularity of mobile phones ( Lenhart et al., 2015 ). In Part 2, we can read not only about the problematic mobile phone use, but also can learn more about safeguarding the youth’s Internet usage as parents, sexual

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M. Kitamura 2009 Addictive personality and problematic mobile phone use CyberPsychology & Behavior 12 5 501 507

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Christoph Randler, Lucia Wolfgang, Katharina Matt, Eda Demirhan, Mehmet Barış Horzum and Şenol Beşoluk

contradictory. Some studies reported that females are more likely to be addicted to smartphones and more likely to engage in problematic mobile phone use ( Augner & Hacker, 2012 ; Billieux, Van der Linden, & Rochat, 2008 ; Lee, Chang, Lin, & Cheng, 2014 ; Mok

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. , & Hacker , G. W. ( 2012 ). Associations between problematic mobile phone use and psychological parameters in young adults . International Journal of Public Health, 57 ( 2 ), 437 – 441 . doi: 10.1007/s00038-011-0234-z 10.1007/s00038

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