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psychosocial consequences ( Long et al., 2016 ; Lopez-Fernandez, Honrubia-Serrano, Freixa-Blanxart, & Gibson, 2014 ). However, little is known about the core features of problematic smartphone use and its underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Previous studies

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to their constant use, may lead to increased anxiety when the device is absent. Several studies have reported associations between problematic smartphone use and social interaction anxiety ( Enez Darcin et al., 2016 ; Lee, 2015 ; Sapacz, Rockman

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, education, and entertainment, but they might represent a potential risk factor for teenagers who overuse and become dependent on them. Longitudinal research based on young adults and adolescents revealed that excessive problematic smartphone use (PSU) is a

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adolescents and create a new and complex virtual context in which youth interact and socialize. Smartphones readily facilitate activities such as online social networking and online gaming. However, problematic smartphone use (PSU) may contribute to the

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). Although smartphones have many advantages, societies (e.g., researchers) have discussed the phenomenon of problematic smartphone use, which can be defined as compulsive and dependent use that interferes with a user’s daily life ( Horwood & Anglim, 2018

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many advantages, societies (e.g., researchers) have discussed the phenomenon of problematic smartphone use, which can be defined as compulsive and dependent use that interferes with a user’s daily life ( Horwood & Anglim, 2018 ). Many researchers have

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, Nikčević, & Moneta, 2008 ), problematic social networking site use (PSNSU; Casale, Rugai, & Fioravanti, 2018 ; Marino et al., 2019 ; Ünal-Aydın, Obuca, Aydın, & Spada, 2021 ), and problematic smartphone use (PSU; Akbari, Zamani, Fioravanti, & Casale

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, 2010 ), which in turn can lead to problematic smartphone use (PSU) among a minority of individuals. The prevalence of PSU varies between populations, but has been reported at 10% among British adolescents ( Lopez-Fernandez, Honrubia-Serrano, Freixa

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& Middlemiss, 2017 ). Smartphone use in non-working hours could lead to poor work-family balance and induce family conflicts ( Derks, van Duin, Tims, & Bakker, 2015 ). Problematic smartphone use (PSU) is defined as an impaired ability to control the extent of

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Haoran Meng, Hongjian Cao, Ruining Hao, Nan Zhou, Yue Liang, Lulu Wu, Lianjiang Jiang, Rongzi Ma, Beilei Li, Linyuan Deng, Zhong Lin, Xiuyun Lin, and Jintao Zhang

devices while growing up and living in an era of unprecedented advancements in smart technologies, especially smartphones ( Bianchi & Phillips, 2005 ; Kim, 2017 ). Therefore, they may be more susceptible to the development of problematic smartphone use

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