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festivals and talent nurturing camps, hosts publications, establishes and awards prizes (Imre Forbáth Prize for poetry, Alfonz Talamon Prize for prose, Tibor Simkó Prize for children's literature, Lajos Turczel Prize for social science). From the 2010s on, a

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festivals and talent nurturing camps, hosts publications, establishes and awards prizes (Imre Forbáth Prize for poetry, Alfonz Talamon Prize for prose, Tibor Simkó Prize for children's literature, Lajos Turczel Prize for social science). From the 2010s on, a

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considers the transcultural positions of author, text, reader and context, and internalizes and reconciles the two different approaches to the corpus in an inclusive way ( Németh, 2019 , pp. 12–15). Contemporary Slovakian Hungarian prose is closely connected

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considers the transcultural positions of author, text, reader and context, and internalizes and reconciles the two different approaches to the corpus in an inclusive way ( Németh, 2019 , pp. 12–15). Contemporary Slovakian Hungarian prose is closely connected

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Abstract  

The Comparative History of European Literatures, published by John Benjamins, includes five volumes on Romanticism which culminate with comprehensive studies of the non-fictional and the fictional prose of the period. All five volumes document Romanticism as a pan-European movement sharing literary motifs and topoi across national boundaries. Of special significance in the last two volumes is the close examination of genre new to the period and the rapidity with which new forms of non-fictional prose influenced corresponding innovation in fictional narrative. Prominent among the emergent forms of prose fiction were the detective story, the Bildungsroman, the Gothic tale and the case study of mental pathology.

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Creative memory is the dominant feature in the writing process of Nabokov’s prose in general, and that of the novel The Gift in particular. Mnemosyna in Nabokov’s word has many faces, such as memory concrete, creative recollection, mystic-transcendental as well as cultural-reminiscential memory. The concrete memory of an event produces the illusion of lifelikeness; the rest of Mnemosyna’s hypostases weave a magic fabric of artistic endeavour. It can be observed in the specific style of Nabokov’s prose: loyalty to reality of life blended organically with fantasy and irrational-transcendental epiphanies of the artist-demiurge.

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Abstract  

Focusing on the work of Miljenko Jergović, Nenad Veličković, Alma Lazarevska, and Saša Stanišić, this paper examines how the representation of the recent past intertwines with the construction of collective memory in contemporary Bosnian prose. The author argues that a first, significant function of recent Bosnian literature consisted of not only witnessing the horror of the Bosnian war but also turning historical events into sites of memory. This is especially true for the literature about the wars of the nineties—the siege of Sarajevo, Srebrenica, etc. However, the involvement of Bosnian authors with the recent past—in prose written during the war as well as in more recent works—proves to be more complex and seems to be indicative of a growing interest in and reflexivity upon the ways in which collective and individual memory are constructed. This paper suggests that the interest in memory/remembering the recent past has been accelerated by the war and the social and political turmoil of the nineties. This liminal situation urged writers firstly to represent the horrors of the recent past in order to prevent them from falling into oblivion. Secondly, because war emerged as a kind of turning point, a radical break between past and present, writers were compelled to reflect on the processes of remembering and oblivion and on the ways identity is constituted by a strange and often unpredictable interplay of both.

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Summary  

Based on the social and cultural changes in 1989, the paper discusses the process of transformation in Slovak literature. Based on the former three areas of literary production, the article offers a preview of the crucial trends and categories of contemporary literary production. It identifies and specifies the nature and vehicles of expression used in Slovak post-modern narration. It also presents multiculturalism as one of the latest Euro-Slovak tendencies in fiction. Ethical and religious dimensions are an inseparable part of renewed literary production in Slovakia. The production is classified also according to the dominance of empathy and/or subjectivity in a particular text. The latest trends are based either on parody, irony, and pla(y)giarism, or on religious values. The works of the youngest generation of authors are constructed on authentic feeling and subjective experience.

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