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. Beveridge , Erskine 1924: Fergusson’s Scottish Proverbs from the Original Print of 1641 together with a Larger Manuscript Collection of about the Same Period Hitherto Unpublished . Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons

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Anti-Proverbs on the Basis of Socio-Linguistic Surveys]. (paper) Nyelvi Modernizáció. Szaknyelv, fordítás, terminológia. XVI. Magyar Alkalmazott Nyelvészeti Kongresszus. Szent István Egyetem . Gödöllő, April 10–12, 2006. Boronkai

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Barta , Péter 2006: Contamination in French Anti-Proverbs (paper, June 10, 2006). Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Phraseology International Conference, organised by the Institute of German Studies of the Pannonian University of Veszprém (Hungary

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graffiti Literatura Ludowa 1999 3 17 26 T. LITOVKINA , Anna 2004: Old Proverbs Never Die: Anti-Proverbs in the Language Classroom, in: Földes, Csaba (ed.), Res humanae proverbiorum et

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Gossen , Gary 1994 [1973]: Chamula Tzotzil Proverbs, in: Wolfgang Mieder (ed.), Wise Words , 351–392. New York and London: Garland Publishing. Gossen G. Wise Words 1994

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Albig , William 1931: Proverbs and Social Control. Sociology and Social Control 15, 527–535. Albig W. Proverbs and Social Control Sociology and Social Control 1931

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Proverbium: Yearbook of International Proverb Scholarship 1984 1 1 38 Arora , Shirley L. 1991: Weather Proverbs: Some ‘Folk’ Views, in: Proverbium: Yearbook of International Proverb Scholarship 8

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Arora Shirley 1995: The perception of proverbiality. De Proverbio: An Electronic Journal of International Proverb Studies . Issue 1: www.deproverbio.com Čermák Frantisek 1998: Usage of Proverbs. What the

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Wolfgang : Old Proverbs Cannot Die. They Just Diversify. A Collection of Anti-Proverbs . Burlington-Veszprém , 2005 . Margalits 1897 M argalits Ede

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Summary

Among old Dutch proverbs and those in Japanese there are many similar views of life, wisdom and moral lessons, even though the phrasing may differ. The present author discusses twelve proverbs from Pieter Bruegel the Elder's Netherlandish Proverbs (1559) in Berlin and corresponding old Japanese proverbs and sayings in Japanese art to compare expressions, items of each proverb, meaning, degree of morality and other concerns. The present author also refers to some literary (Erasmus, Anna Bijns, Donaes Idinau and Carolus Tuiman and other literati) as well as visual background (misericords, engravings by Frans Hogenberg, Nicolaes Clock and other artists) before and after Bruegel's time as parallel examples. Proverbs in Ukiyoe, illustrations of proverb books, and cartoons by Japanese artists, such as those by Utagawa Toyokuni the Elder, Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Kawanabe Kyôsai, make good comparisons of Bruegel's work. Bruegel's representation of “Casting roses before swine”corresponds to Kuniyoshi's “Gold coins to a cat.”Both indicate almost the same meaning to give valuable advice or things to those who are unable to appreciate them. However, Bruegel's “He falls from the ox onto the ass”is meant to denote falling from a higher position to a lower one, while Kyôsai's “To jump from a cow to a horse”signifies the opposite situation; that is, a man exchanges his old wife for a young wife. In general, Japanese proverbial images give us the impression of a more comic and humorous sentiment than we find in Bruegel's didactic world.

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