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Journal of Adult Learning, Knowledge and Innovation
Authors: Veronika Bocsi, Tímea Ceglédi, Zsófia Kocsis, Karolina Eszter Kovács, Klára Kovács, Anetta Müller, Katalin Pallay, Barbara Éva Szabó, Fruzsina Szigeti, and Dorina Anna Tóth

) – that can predict institutional dropout? To answer these questions, a qualitative research methodology was applied through the analysis of seven individual interviews and one focus group conversation involving 10 participants, based on a semi

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Michael W. Firmin, Alisha D. Lee, Ruth L. Firmin, Lauren McCotter Deakin, and Hannah J. Holmes

. R. C. Bogdan S. K. Biklen 2007 Qualitative research for education 5th ed. Allyn & Bacon

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This article reveals the possible connections between the forms of cooperation and the conflict resolution methods in the case of the Hungarian suppliers' - manufacturers' relations. These connections are presented in the light of the results of a research made via interviews. The results showed that in these inter-company connections the companies try to prevent the conflicts by the establishment of long- term partnerships and the connections are coordinated not mostly by the contractual relationship but by the mutually negotiated common rules and trust. Keeping this partnership is a very important intent in the solution of conflicts, however, the unbalanced power relations, the internal organization structure of companies do not always make possible to apply a way of conflict management that could deepen the partnership. In spite of this, the institution of partnership and the type of the supplied products can cause a kind of interdependence that makes possible the co-operative conflict resolution methods.

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discussion between raters. NVivo 10 qualitative research software was used to organize and quantify the data. Ethics The study procedures were carried out with high ethical standards as outlined in the American

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Nicolas A. Bonfils, Marie Grall-Bronnec, Julie Caillon, Frédéric Limosin, Amine Benyamina, Henri-Jean Aubin, and Amandine Luquiens

This study was conducted in compliance with the Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research guideline ( O’Brien, Harris, Beckman, Reed, & Cook, 2014 ). Sample Subjects were recruited from three sites in France: (a) Two

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coding-frame was built up successively until a point of saturation was reached. After the ninth interview, no further categories had to be introduced in order to classify new material. In qualitative research, it is not yet fully possible to calculate

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. , & Clarke , V. ( 2006 ). Using thematic analysis in psychology . Qualitative Research in Psychology , 3 ( 2 ), 77 – 101 . Bromley , D.B. ( 1986 ). The case study method

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): Introduction: The Discipline and Practice of Qualitative Research . in: The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research , 1 – 33 . 22. Eder , K. , Rauer , V. , Schmidtke , O. ( 2004 ): Die

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Today, companies have to face new challanges because of the globalization, new technologies, globalization of markets and increasing competition. In this accelerated world, it is essential that the companies adapt to the market, which is only available through the necessary information. The importance of market research is undoubted. In our study we would like to prove that in case of a beginner company — in this case a confectionery — it is important to perform a market research like for a company in any other segment. To perform it, the qualitative market research methods were used. Our questionnaire examines several aspects in order to provide an indication of the company’s founding.

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Background and aims

Binge-watching (i.e., seeing multiple episodes of the same TV series in a row) now constitutes a widespread phenomenon. However, little is known about the psychological factors underlying this behavior, as reflected by the paucity of available studies, most merely focusing on its potential harmfulness by applying the classic criteria used for other addictive disorders without exploring the uniqueness of binge-watching. This study thus aimed to take the opposite approach as a first step toward a genuine understanding of binge-watching behaviors through a qualitative analysis of the phenomenological characteristics of TV series watching.

Methods

A focus group of regular TV series viewers (N = 7) was established to explore a wide range of aspects related to TV series watching (e.g., motives, viewing practices, and related behaviors).

Results

A content analysis identified binge-watching features across three dimensions: TV series watching motivations, TV series watching engagement, and structural characteristics of TV shows. Most participants acknowledged that TV series watching can become addictive, but they all agreed having trouble recognizing themselves as truly being an “addict.” Although obvious connections could be established with substance addiction criteria and symptoms, such parallelism appeared to be insufficient, as several distinctive facets emerged (e.g., positive view, transient overinvolvement, context dependency, and low everyday life impact).

Discussion and conclusion

The research should go beyond the classic biomedical and psychological models of addictive behaviors to account for binge-watching in order to explore its specificities and generate the first steps toward an adequate theoretical rationale for these emerging problematic behaviors.

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